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BBC Autos

Evolution of Design

A quick visual history of the Chevrolet Camaro Z/28

About the author

Editor of BBC Autos, Matthew is a former editor at Automobile Magazine and the creator of the digital-only Roadtrip Magazine. His automotive and travel writing has appeared in such magazines as Wired, Popular Science, The Robb Report and Caribbean Travel + Life. He lives in Los Angeles with his wonderful wife and four-year-old daughter.

 

  • As Chevy's track star makes its return, a look back

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1970 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1972 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1974 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1978 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1979 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1980 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1982 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 Indianapolis 500 Pace Car

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1983 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1987 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1993 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1995 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 1997 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 30th Anniversary Edition

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

  • 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28

    Among the loud and proud community of Chevrolet Camaro enthusiasts, the Z/28 moniker is a hallowed one. The original Camaro Z/28 coupe debuted in 1967, a car built to compete in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans-Am 2 class. Lightweight and track-focused, Camaros equipped with the $328.10 Z/28 package featured a host of racy upgrades, including a smaller, 302-cubic-inch V8 engine for improved weight balance, quick-ratio steering and a race-ready suspension. Power-assisted front disc brakes were a separate — and mandatory — option. Air conditioning and an automatic transmission? Forget about it.

    Over the years, Chevrolet has evoked the "Z" moniker to define its top-dog Camaros, but as a true aficionado of the breed will be quick to point out, the slash matters. There is a saying that goes, "Z/28: The car made the name; Z28: The name made the car." The original 1967-69 models wore the Z-slash-28 emblem; all successors wore the slash-less "Z28" badge.

    For 2014, the Z-slash-28 is back. With the Camaro SS and ZL1 firmly established as the model's road-focused image leaders, Chevrolet engineers and marketers could withhold the "Z" designation until they had a Camaro that was, at last, worthy of the slash. The 2014 Camaro Z/28, like the original model, is wholly focused on racetrack dominance. "As the ultimate track-capable Camaro, this car restores the mission of the original Z/28," says GM North America president Mark Reuss. "The build sheet is the wish list of any racer: lightweight, high-revving, dry-sump LS7 engine; carbon-ceramic brakes; integrated coolers for track use; true aerodynamic downforce, and a significant reduction in curb weight." And yes, the new Z/28 comes only with a manual transmission, and air conditioning is optional.

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