BBC Capital

New year may bring glad tidings for unemployed

(Thinkstock)

(Thinkstock)

Finally, a bit of good news for those still searching for a job — at least in the United States.

Hiring may pick up in 2014, according to a recent economic outlook survey of US chief executive officers.

These are glad tidings for some of the millions of unemployed Americans. About 34% of the CEOs surveyed said they expect to hire more over the next six months, as the US economy improves.

That’s up from the 32% of CEOS who in September said that they would likely boost hiring over the next six months. The executives did not specify by how much they planned to increase hiring.

“CEO expectations for economic expansion in the next six months increased slightly from last quarter, with expectations for sales, capital investment and hiring all tracking somewhat higher,” said Jim McNerney, Chairman of Business Roundtable, and Chairman, President and CEO of Boeing Co, in a release.

As of October, there were 11.3 million, or 7.3%, unemployed in the US, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. About 4.1 million of those had been without jobs for 27 weeks or more. 

In October, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development a think-tank for 34 mainly developed countries, reported that one in three unemployed — or 17 million people — in the 32 countries it monitors around the globe, has been out of work for at least 12 months. Even so, the report said that a few countries had begun to see long-term unemployment fall. Among them: Belgium, the Netherlands, Poland and Turkey. Still, the OECD expects unemployment to rise further in the Eurozone countries it monitors in 2014.

The Business Roundtable is an association of CEOs of US companies with $7.4 trillion in annual revenues. The survey was conducted in November and results were based on the responses of 120 CEOs who represent  57% of the total Business Roundtable membership. Altogether, member companies employ more than 16 million people and comprise more than a third of the total value of the US stock market.

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