It's the BBC Earth weird and wonderful photo quiz.

This is your chance to prove to yourself and others what you know about life on this planet.

Guess what weird and wonderful things are in these 15 photos below. Make a note of how many you get right, and share your score with us on BBC Earth on Facebook and Twitter, using #EarthQuiz.

Answers are below the images. No early peeking!

IMAGE ONE

IMAGE TWO

IMAGE THREE

IMAGE FOUR

IMAGE FIVE

IMAGE SIX

IMAGE SEVEN

IMAGE EIGHT

IMAGE NINE

IMAGE TEN

IMAGE ELEVEN

IMAGE TWELVE

IMAGE THIRTEEN

IMAGE FOURTEEN

IMAGE FIFTEEN

THE ANSWERS

We don't expect you get the exact species, but be honest with yourself about whether you were close.

IMAGE ONE

This is a spider beetle, an insect named after its resemblance to the spiders. Belonging to the genus Gibbium, this beetle lives in Tucson, Arizona in the US. Beetles within this genus can live on all continents except Antarctica. The beetle is also a member of the family Anobiidae. Larvae of beetles in this family often like boring into wood, and Gibbium beetles can infest stored products and cargo.

IMAGE TWO

A close-up portrait image of a Dalmatian pelican (Pelecanus crispus), a sea bird living on Lake Kerkini in Greece. These are huge birds; Dalmatian pelicans reach a size of 1.8 metres. It likes to feed on fish, and adults mate in monogamous pairs. After massive declines during the 19th and 20th centuries, numbers have stabilised between 10,000-20,000 individuals.

IMAGE THREE

You may put this in your tea or cereal. It's sugar, specifically crystals of the sugar sucrose. Sucrose is extracted from the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) or cane sugar (Saccharum officinarum) plants, and this image of sucrose crystals was taken using a coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). If this photo is printed 10 centimetres wide, it will show the crystals magnified x65.

IMAGE FOUR

An insect, known as a treehopper (Heteronotus maculatus) on a leaf, photographed in South America. Treehoppers (family Membracidae) are insects whose bodies often take on bizarre forms thought to aid in camouflage, however this species has evolved to resemble a wasp. They are related to cicadas and leafhoppers. There are over 3,000 known species in over 600 genera, found on all continents except Antarctica.

IMAGE FIVE

The abstract image was taken by satellite - and shows a conical pit on the side of Pavonis Mons, a giant shield volcano on Mars. At the centre of the pit is a hole (black) that opens up into a cavern in the volcano. A debris pile (grey) of material that has fallen from the pit can be seen through the hole. The pile is at least 62 metres tall, with its top 28 metres below the rim of the pit. This image was obtained by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter satellite.

IMAGE SIX

Look closely and it's a fish. But what type? This is a Paddle-flap scorpionfish, sometimes known as Eschmeyer's scorpionfish (Rhinopias eschmeyeri), camouflaged against a rubble slope under the sea in Bitung, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. These fish are often taken from the wild in Asia, and sold into the aquarium trade. The fish has two tentacles on the underside of the lower jaw.

IMAGE SEVEN

An unusual image of a lizard (Leiocephalus sp.) This image was acquired using X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (also known as micro-CT). Leiocephalus lizards are often known as curly-tailed lizards. They live in the Caribbean and there are 29 known species described so far.

IMAGE EIGHT

This is a sea spider, photographed on coral. An unusual species called Anoplodactylus petiolatus, it was photographed off Kapalai, Sabah, Malaysia, on the island of Borneo. Sea spiders are a group of marine arthropods that resemble true, terrestrial spiders, although they are only distantly related. Some deep-sea species are 2-feet (60 cm) wide.

IMAGE NINE

This is an image of something much closer to home; the human brain. Specifically, it shows the pattern of fibres within the brain's white matter, which transmit nerve signals between brain regions and between the brain and the spinal cord. The image was created using a technique called Diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), a variant of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in which a magnetic field maps the water contained in neuron fibres, mapping their criss-crossing patterns.

IMAGE TEN

This is actually another fish. It is a close-up of the mouth and other underside structures of a stingray (Taeniura meyeni), photographed at Vaavu Atoll, in the Maldives, an island nation in the Indian Ocean. This species can grow to 1.8 metres wide, and has various names, including the Black-blotched Stingray, Black-spotted Stingray, Blotched Fantail Ray, Fantail Stingray, Giant Reef Ray, Round Ribbontail Ray, and Speckled Stingray.

IMAGE ELEVEN

This is something else within you; fat tissue. The image shows fat cells (adipocytes, blue) surrounded by fine strands of supportive connective tissue. Adipocytes are among the largest cells in the human body, each cell being 100 to 120 microns in diameter. Almost the entire volume of each fat cell consists of a single lipid (fat or oil) droplet. Adipose tissue forms an insulating layer under the skin, storing energy in the form of fat, which is obtained from food. The image was taken using the coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) technique, and is at a magnification of x165 when printed 10 centimetres wide.

IMAGE TWELVE

This challenging image is of a porpoise foetus. This dead specimen was collected from a pregnant Harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) that was already herself deceased, having stranded. Scientists sample deceased whales, dolphins and porpoises as part of the UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme. Few cetacean foetuses are available for study and these scans help researchers understand their development. This image of a harbour porpoise was acquired using a technique called X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (also known as micro-CT). The red areas indicate high density material, in this case enamel on teeth and ear bones.

IMAGE THIRTEEN

A skeleton on an animal, but of what? It's a chameleon placed upon a branch. Old world lizards, there are around 180 species, many of which can change colour. Watch a stunning new BBC Earth film of a veiled chameleon here.

IMAGE FOURTEEN

A bit creepy this one; it's the head of a tapeworm, specifically the head (scolex) of a dog tapeworm (Taenia pisiformis). This tapeworm has dogs and foxes as its final hosts and rabbits and hares as its intermediate hosts. The hooks at the tip of the scolex (turquoise) are used to anchor the worm to its host's intestinal lining. It does not possess a digestive tract and so absorbs nutrients from the half-digested food of the host through its skin. Another image taken using a coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM), at a magnification of x75 when printed at 10 centimetres wide.

IMAGE FIFTEEN

This is species of 'Dumbo' or flapjack octopus. These octopuses, which belong to the genus Grimpoteuthis are a deep water species. They are called 'Dumbo' owing to the large fins on their mantles and their similarity in appearance to the children's character, Dumbo. These octopuses have webbing between the tentacles. This individual was captured in a trawl between the ocean surface and 500 metres.

How did you do? Share your score with us on BBC Earth on Facebook and Twitter using #EarthQuiz.