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Decoding the secrets of dolphins’ language

Denise Herzing has spent the last 25 years trying to learn the “language” of dolphins. Here she explains the challenges facing those trying to crack the code.

Humans have a strong affinity with dolphins. The marine mammals are regarded as one of the world’s most intelligent species, travelling in pods which display complex hierarchies and group cultures.

Behavioural biologist Dr Denise Herzing has spent the last 25 years trying to find out what makes dolphins tick – studying their social structure and behaviour in the wild, and attempting to decode the body language and intricate sounds dolphins use to communicate with each other.

Do dolphins have a language? What are they saying? And could we one day learn it? Herzing explains how dolphins may be saying a lot more than we give them credit for.

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