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In Depth

What do we really need the Moon for?

The Moon is such a familiar presence in the sky that most of us take it for granted. But what if it wasn't where it is now? How would that affect life on Earth?

Space scientist Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock, an expert on the Moon, explores our intimate relationship with our planet’s rocky satellite. Besides orchestrating the tides, the Moon dictates the length of a day, the rhythm of the seasons and the very stability of Earth.

Yet the Moon doesn’t stay still. In the past it was closer to the Earth and in the future it will be further away. It’s lucky that it is now perfectly placed to help sustain life. 

Using computer graphics to summon up great tides and set the Earth spinning on its side, Aderin-Pocock implores us to look at the Moon afresh: to see it not as an inert rock, but as a key player in the story of our planet’s past, present and future.

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