The teenage scientist tracking a sea of space junk

Every spacecraft or satellite launched has to contend with a vast belt of debris left in orbit. One teenage scientist has worked out a way to keep it out of harm’s way.

When Amber Yang watched the film Gravity – which features a cataclysmic collision which destroys the International Space Station – it gave her an idea.

She knew that hundreds and thousands of miles above Earth, pieces of wreckage were whizzing around our planet – some of them big enough to cause billions of dollars worth of damage to precious satellites and spacecraft.

So Yang, bored by her schoolwork, decided to try and find a way of tracking it, and ensuring cosmic debris doesn’t become a danger to the next generation of humans venturing into space.

Video by Daniel Kavanaugh. Additional editing by Bernadette Young.

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