Scotland

Scottish Tories review confirmed

Scottish Conservative leader Annabel Goldie
Image caption A commission will examine the party's strategy and recommend any changes

The Scottish Conservatives have announced a formal review into the future direction of the party.

Despite the Tories gaining almost 100 seats across the UK, the party failed to improve on the one seat it held in Scotland at the general election.

Their only MP, David Mundell, was among those attending a Conservative council meeting in Edinburgh.

Scottish Tory chairman Andrew Fulton said, with the election over, it was appropriate to review their approach.

The meeting came a week after Tory peer Lord Forsyth described his party as a "marginal" force in Scotland.

He said it was time for a structural rethink of the Conservatives north of the border.

'Fit for purpose'

A commission, chaired by Lord Sanderson, will be set up to look at the structures of the Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party and examine how it works, and recommend any changes which would strengthen it.

Mr Fulton said: "I am delighted that Lord Sanderson has agreed to chair the commission, and its membership represents a wide range of expertise and experience.

"I am ambitious for the Scottish Conservative Party and I want to ensure that everything we do is fit for political purpose.

"Scottish politics is locked in a near permanent cycle of elections, and we must be certain that we are able effectively to target our resources and have the structures and personnel best able to deliver Conservative policies and ideals."

The commission will produce a report over the next few months and report back to the party's executive committee.

Scottish Conservative leader Annabel Goldie said: "As a political party, we must always be open to fresh thinking and new ideas. It is a positive step to set up this commission.

"It will be open to everyone who has a view on how we take our party forward. No modern, progressive, political party should be resistant to change."

It has been suggested the party could examine splitting from members in England, possibly changing its name and electing a Scottish leader.

The Conservatives won 306 seats at the general election and went on to form a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats.

In Scotland, they won just one seat out of 59.

More on this story

Around the BBC

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites