Glasgow & West Scotland

Father vows to find Glasgow hit-and-run driver

Alastair Harvie
Image caption Alastair Harvie was knocked down while on a night out in Glasgow

The father of a 17-year-old knocked down in Glasgow city centre has vowed to do everything he can to trace the hit and run driver responsible.

Alastair Harvie was struck by a car as he crossed St Vincent Street with friends almost a fortnight ago.

The vehicle involved appeared to be racing another car and failed to stop at a red light.

Douglas Harvie, 53, said his son had been left fighting for his life.

Alastair Harvie had been on a night out with friends to celebrate the end of his Higher exams.

As they crossed the road at the junction with Hope Street two cars jumped the lights and one hit him so hard its windscreen shattered.

Douglas Harvie said: "I can't actually quite believe that somebody can go to bed at the moment and shut their eyes and go to sleep knowing fine well that they hit a six foot one, twelve stone rugby player.

"They know what they have done and I can't quite get my head around that."

Witnesses said the 17-year-old was hit by a dark-coloured twin top convertible, and the other car involved was a Vauxhall Corsa.

Strathclyde Police said young drivers involved in "car cruising" often came into the city centre and officers believe they may hold the key to tracing the driver responsible.

Sgt Mark Gillespie from the force's road policing unit said: "There is a car cruising community who frequent Glasgow city centre made up of young people who generally are law abiding, who take a great pride in their vehicles.

"We have information that they know the identity of the driver and I would ask that they contact us."

Douglas Harvie has also urged anyone with information about the identity of the person who hit his son to come forward and speak to the police.

Alastair Harvie remains in the Southern General Hospital in Glasgow where he is being treated fior serious head injuries.

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