Nilson Tuwe Huni Kuĩ in a New York park
Media playback is unsupported on your device
Video

Culture shock for Amazon chief's son who left rainforest for New York

Nilson Tuwe Huni Kui lives a long way from New York City. In fact, the 29-year-old lives a long way from anywhere.

His village in the Amazon rainforest has a population of only 600 people and it takes five days of travelling by boat to reach the nearest town.

Yet the son of the traditional chief of the Huni Kiu Kaxinawa tribes in Brazil has swapped the rainforest for the concrete jungle, and now calls the Big Apple home.

"My father is what Obama is for you," he explains.

As a youth leader, Tuwe carries the responsibility of making his people's culture and problems known to the world.

After being sent to a summit in Rio de Janeiro last summer he was given an opportunity to study in New York thanks to Tribal Link's Indigenous Fellowship Program and the Nataasha van Kampen Foundation. The Post Factory in Manhattan has been helping him learn to edit so he can pursue his dream of becoming a documentary film-maker.

The BBC spoke to Tuwe about getting used to the city's subway and fast food as well as the challenges indigenous communities face from loggers and drug cartels.

Produced for the BBC by Anna Bressanin; images by Ilya Shnitser.

Video from the Amazon by Nilson Tuwe Huni Kui.

Go to next video: Shark attack survivor saves great whites