Guide Armand Marozafy on illegally logged trees in Madagascar.
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Inside a forest damaged by Madagascar's illegal loggers

Madagascar's national parks have been plundered of an estimated 100,000 rosewood and ebony trees in the past year by illegal loggers.

Because rare trees like rosewood grow so slowly, taking more than 100 years to reach maturity, logging of the species is unsustainable.

The exploitation of rosewood in Madagascar was banned in 2000.

Since then, some logging has officially been allowed, but never at the levels seen recently.

Here, wildlife guide Armand Marozafy shows how locals are illegally logging trees for profit.

You can hear more on this story on BBC Radio 4's Crossing Continents programme. Download the podcast or listen on the BBC iPlayer. Follow Crossing Continents on Twitter.

  • 04 Aug 2010
  • From the section Africa
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