Turchynov: Soviet ‘resurrection’ has failed

 
Acting Ukrainian President Oleksandr V Turchynov n Kiev on 23 February Acting Ukrainian President Oleksandr V Turchynov says the Kremlin tried to weaken Ukraine

The plan for the "resurrection" of the Soviet empire has failed, writes acting Ukrainian President Oleksandr V Turchynov in a New York Times opinion piece on Thursday.

Ukrainian interim Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk was in Washington to visit with US President Barack Obama on Wednesday. Mr Tuchynov's New York Times piece is part of an effort to keep the Ukrainian situation at the forefront for the US public.

"The Kremlin had a strategy designed to weaken Ukraine and its government by prying some regions away from Kiev's control and establishing enclaves in the south and east similar to Transnistria in Moldova and Abkhazia and South Ossetia in Georgia," he writes.

According to the Week magazine, the G7 group of nations has called on Russia to halt all attempts to annex the Ukrainian Crimea, saying the region's referendum plans were a "deeply flawed process which would have no moral force".

Mr Turchynov writes that Russia is trying to provoke Ukraine into a "trap" - a military confrontation that could be a pretext for full invasion.

Start Quote

Russia must choose how it will respond”

End Quote Oleksandr V Turchynov Acting Ukrainian president

"No one should doubt that Ukrainians are prepared to defend their country," he says. "But the memory of our people's terrible losses during the protests in Kiev is still fresh; we cannot permit more bloodshed."

He notes that Ukraine gave up its Soviet-era nuclear weapons in a 1993 agreement that assured its territorial integrity.

Armed men patrolled Simferopol's airport last month Mr Turchynov hopes Americans will keep paying attention to Ukraine - above, armed men patrolled Simferopol's airport last month

He writes: "If this agreement is violated, it may lead to nuclear proliferation around the world.

The rule of law and the credibility of international institutions would also be severely undermined as deterrents to military aggression."

He concludes: "Ukraine is open to any constructive dialogue with the Russian Federation that is rooted in partnership. We wish to develop fair and mutually beneficial relations. Russia must choose how it will respond."

The US has continued to pursue diplomatic efforts with Russia, and US Secretary of State John Kerry plans to travel to London for talks with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on Friday.

Mr Kerry says he will present his Russian counterpart with "a series of options" for resolving the crisis.

 

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  • rate this
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    Comment number 12.

    There are 1 million plus Canadians of either partial or full Ukrainian descent, many who served in the Canadian military, a fact the Russians may not have thought of.

    A Russian war with Ukraine will have some surprises. A short trip over the pole & 300-500 000+ well armed & trained Ukrainian/Canadians may go home to protect our heritage, our relatives, our homelands.

    Putin needs to walk away!!

  • Comment number 21.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 22.

    Is it just me or does anyone else looking at Turchynov immediately think of a brutal SS officer in a gulag

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 23.

    Turch, the ONLY thing that has failed, is the US/NATO attempt to remove the Black Sea Fleet and replace it with a US/NATO fleet instead.
    Please, can you and Yats just stop crying like little babies because honestly, you are both making yourselves look not only stupid, but incapable of making any decisions yourselves. Oh wait, I forgot, you AREN'T making ANY decisions re Ukraine are you lol.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 25.

    "has now invaded , a sovereign country, and is taking control by force. "

    Hasn't the West previously invaded sovereign countries , Iraq and Afghanistan , and taken control by force ?

    Why have we not seen the same level of support for pro-democracy demonstrators in Bahrain or Turkey ?

    The West seems happy to "protect civilians " in countries where our main (real !) objective is regime change .

 

Comments 5 of 28

 

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