Time to start talking Europe

 
French voters queue to vote The European Union will be hoping for a strong turnout across its 28 states

Welcome to the BBC's new Inside Europe blog.

On these pages in the coming weeks and months, BBC teams around the EU will be sharing their thoughts as they go about their reporting before the next European elections at the end of May.

We are always looking for different ways to cover the news, and we'll be keen to hear back on the form below - or via the Twitter hashtag #BBCInsideEurope - whether you think this new blog is working.

Some of the writers here may be familiar - like BBC Europe correspondents Matthew Price and Chris Morris - and our on-air reporters in the key European cities, such as Paris, Berlin and Rome. But we're also aiming to create a platform for other BBC journalists, our producers, researchers and camera operators, to have their say and to point out interesting facts, images or pieces of video.

Why now? Well, campaigning is getting under way for the May elections to the European Parliament, which will result in 751 MEPs representing the EU's 500 million citizens.

So we think it's a good time for our teams to start flagging up key issues, as well as some of the interesting fragments of information a modern journalist comes across every day that do not necessarily make it into our mainstream reporting.

And in Britain, the elections in May seem likely to mark the start of a period of intense focus on Europe policy. A general election is due in 2015 and there is now the prospect of a potential referendum on the UK's continued membership of the EU, by the end of 2017. As a public broadcaster, we feel a special responsibility to contribute to the debate from all angles.

So here goes....

 

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  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 502.

    As we are ONLY ONE of 5 net contributers into the EU pot.
    If we did get out.. how would the EU make up the 20% shortfall ?

    Would it collapse without UK contributions ?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 501.

    It's a hoot, that some people take the mere fact, that the BBC has not decided to deny completely the very existence of the EU, by starting this page, as evidence of "extreme pro-EU bias".

    By their logic, Farage should be the most extreme pro EU of all, as 100% of his salary comes from it.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 500.

    There are people putting money and surface issues ahead of the value of democracy... Sell outs.

    I wouldn't well democracy for 1000 trillion... To any king, queen, emperor or in this case communist.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 499.

    @492. Eltener
    I find it ludicrous that people in this country genuinely think that European countries would want to trade with us if we weren't in the EU. Most of them despise us for being so stubborn all the time in the European parliament.
    ---
    I agree 100%, there's no way they would trade with us. When EU trading stops the multi-nationals will pull out of the UK hotly followed by the banks.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 498.

    492
    They would keep trading with us. who else can afford nice new bmw's or audi's. Its cheaper to ship them hear then china.

 

Comments 5 of 502

 

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