Quiz of the week's news

Info

It's the Magazine's 7 days, 7 questions quiz - an opportunity to prove to yourself and others that you are a news oracle. Failing that, you can always claim to have had better things to do during the past week than swot up on current affairs.

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1.) Multiple Choice Question

Why was 1 January dubbed "Green Wednesday" in the US state of Colorado?

Kermit the frog
  1. It became a biodiesel-only state
  2. First legal recreational cannabis sales
  3. To honour freed Greenpeace Arctic detainees

2.) Multiple Choice Question

An MP criticised an anti-obesity measure recently introduced by a UK hospital. Which was it?

Obese man
  1. Fat suit for staff
  2. Chocolate ban
  3. Ward fitness instructor

3.) Multiple Choice Question

A Georgian was dubbed "Magnetic Man" for balancing 53 of what on his body?

Magnet
  1. Tin cans
  2. Spoons
  3. Jar lids

4.) Multiple Choice Question

What did Hull City midfielder Tom Huddlestone do to celebrate scoring a goal at the end of 2013?

Tom Huddlestone
  1. Twerked
  2. Jumped into the stands
  3. Got a tattoo
  4. Went for a haircut

5.) Missing Word Question

Giant * bursts in Taiwan

  1. balloon
  2. rubber duck
  3. dinghy

6.) Multiple Choice Question

What have people been warned to stay away from in the UK's Peak District?

Sheep in the Peak District
  1. A sinkhole
  2. An escaped panther
  3. Landslides

7.) Multiple Choice Question

More women than men featured on the New Year's Honours list for the first time this year. Which woman was NOT on the list?

Angela Lansbury, Karren Brady, Katherine Jenkins and Tracey Emin
  1. Actress Angela Lansbury
  2. Football boss Karren Brady
  3. Mezzo-soprano Katherine Jenkins
  4. Artist Tracey Emin

Answers

  1. Cannabis sales for recreational use became legal. As many as 30 stores were expected to start selling the drug after the state voted to legalise the use and possession of cannabis for people over the age of 21 in November, along with Washington state. The drug is still illegal under federal law.
  2. It's a fat suit. The bariatric training suit, which weighs 13lbs (6kg) and gives the wearer the dimensions of a 40-stone person, was bought by Peterborough City Hospital to help train nurses to deal with morbidly obese patients. MP Stewart Jackson called the suit a "useless gimmick" and waste of money but staff have defended the decision.
  3. Etibar Elchyev, 41, set the world record for the most spoons balanced on a human body.
  4. It was the haircut. The footballer pledged to grow his hair for charity until he next found the net after his last goal in April 2011. After scoring during Hull's 6-0 Premier League victory over Fulham, Huddlestone's celebration saw him have a lock of hair clipped on the sidelines.
  5. It's rubber duck. The giant yellow version of a popular bath toy, designed by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman, was due to be part of New Year celebrations in the port of Keelung, but collapsed suddenly 11 days after it was put on display. Organisers are unsure as to the cause of its demise, but one theory is it was attacked by eagles.
  6. It's a sinkhole, which is believed to be about 160ft (49m) wide and 130ft (40m) deep, and was caused by mining in the area, according to landowner British Fluorspar. Bad weather led to flooding and landslides across parts of the UK.
  7. It's Tracey Emin, who was made a CBE in 2012's New Year's Honours List. This year, Angela Lansbury became a dame, Karren Brady became a CBE and Katherine Jenkins was awarded an OBE.

Your Score

0 - 3 : Nothing like a dame

4 - 6 : Order of Merit

7 - 7 : Most Noble Order

For past quizzes including our weekly news quiz, 7 days 7 questions, expand the grey drop-down below - also available on the Magazine page (and scroll down).

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