India: Police password lost for eight years as complaints mount

Screenshot of a password

Police in India have failed to act on hundreds of corruption complaints over an eight-year period because they did not know a computer password, it seems.

Delhi officers could not operate a portal holding more than 600 complaints - a lapse that has gone undetected since 2006, the Indian Express Newspaper said. The complaints came from India's anti-corruption agency, called the Central Vigilance Commission (CVC).

But two senior police officers have now been trained in the system, and can access the 667 cases that have piled up since the portal launched. One officer told the paper the oversight was "a technical problem", and complaints are now being addressed.

The CVC collates complaints against government officials and directs law enforcement to investigate them. The commission received 36,000 complaints in 2013, figures published by The Economic Times say.

Despite the confusion, police in Delhi "remain committed to public grievances", a senior officer told the Indian Express.

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