Canada: 'Cricket compost box' tackles food problem

Fried insects on a plate

A Canadian university student seems to have come up with a novel way to grow his own food and compost his rubbish at the same time - using crickets.

Jakub Dzamba's invention allows you to raise and eat your own batch of crickets every two months, CBC news reports. He keeps his crickets in a clear plastic box in his kitchen, feeding them scraps of rubbish that might otherwise go onto a compost heap. The crickets are harvested by putting them in the freezer, where Dzamba says they are "euthanised" and can be cooked like any other frozen food.

Dzamba is introducing his home cricket farms at Montreal's Eating Innovation Conference, which focuses on entomophagy - or eating insects. Eating insects wasn't easy at first, he says. "You kill bugs all the time, but when you raise them and have them on your desk for two months, I just didn't have the heart to put them in the fridge and kind of euthanise them." But he's now very enthusiastic about the idea. "I think it can make the world a better place," he says.

Conference organiser Aruna Handa agrees. "They're very nutritious, with comparable protein to meat, more omega-3 fats than fish." A recent UN report urged people to eat insects as a way to combat world hunger and improve their nutrition.

Jakub Dzamba with his cricket farm

Use #NewsfromElsewhere to stay up-to-date with our reports via Twitter.

More on This Story

Elsewhere on the BBC

  • IslandsUnmapped places

    Will the age-old quest to capture uncharted land and space ever end?

Programmes

  • All-inclusive holidaysThe Travel Show Watch

    With all-inclusive holidays seeing a resurgence are local trades missing out to big resorts?

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.