Newspaper headlines: Focus on 'butcher surgeon' conviction

Ian Paterson Image copyright PA
Image caption Ian Paterson was convicted of intentionally wounding patients

Most newspapers lead on the conviction of the breast surgeon, Ian Paterson.

The Daily Mirror calls him a butcher who ruined women's lives, and The Times describes him as a "liar who betrayed patients who adored him".

The Daily Mail demands to know why the NHS failed to stop him.

Many of the papers report the claims that he may have subjected more than 1,000 women to needless surgery - the Daily Express says it may be "thousands".

The Daily Telegraph accuses him of "cruelty beyond understanding" and says the health service must reduce the likelihood of it happening again.


According to The Sun, Theresa May is risking a Cabinet split by not giving her ministers a final say on what goes in the Tory election manifesto.

Her colleagues are said to fear it means the prime minister's aides are getting a free hand in shaping government policy into the next decade.

One unnamed secretary of state tells the paper: "I worry about what I want to keep out of the manifesto more than what I want to get into it."

One possibility mentioned is a capital gains tax on house sales; a Number 10 source assures the paper that won't be in the manifesto.

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The Daily Mail has a double page spread on the release of Alexander Blackman, the former Royal Marine who was jailed for shooting dead a wounded Taliban fighter.

He's pictured being hugged by his wife, Claire, who'd spearheaded a campaign - backed by the Mail - for his release.

Image copyright AFP/Getty Images
Image caption Claire Blackman campaigned for her husband's release

Sergeant Blackman tells the paper: "She has saved me. Her determination to keep on fighting for me has been nothing short of incredible."

He talks of waking up to "the glorious sound of birdsong" and knowing that "suddenly I can sleep when I want, eat when I want, go for a walk" adding: "This freedom of choice is going to take some getting used to."


The Financial Times weekend magazine offers readers the "inside story" of "the court of King Donald", to mark 100 days of the Trump Presidency.

"It was never going to be business as usual," it says, "but leaks, power struggles and policy reversals" have dominated the administration so far.

Image copyright EPA
Image caption Donald Trump has been in office for 100 days

For the Daily Mirror, it's been "failures, U-turns and gaffes", with non-achievements which include not getting Mexico to pay for a border wall, not repealing Obamacare and not deporting two million illegal immigrants.

According to The Times, Mr Trump has "made a splash across the globe", but needs to find "a robust governing coalition" if he wants to overhaul the tax and health systems at home.

"If he is to make a success of the presidency," it says, "he has to replace the raw energy of the sprinter with the stamina of a long-distance runner".


The Times claims the government's core plan for Britain's armed forces will be revised after the election because of a funding crisis.

The paper reported last month that the forces faced a funding gap of at least £10bn over the next decade, with some experts putting the shortfall at double that.

"The unravelling of the 2015 Defence Review," the paper says, "is a blow for the Defence Secretary, Sir Michael Fallon."

Unnamed sources have apparently questioned whether he can remain in post after the election, given what the paper says are the problems he has presided over at the Ministry of Defence.


Image copyright EPA
Image caption IBF heavyweight champion Anthony Joshua will fight Wladimir Klitschko

The Sun has a clenched left fist on the back page that belongs to Anthony Joshua and the paper calls it the "hand of hope 'n glory".

AJ, the paper says, is at his biggest ever - ten pounds above Wladimir Klitschko - in time for their IBF, WBA and IBO heavyweight contest.

The Times declares Joshua "too quick, too strong and too powerful" and concludes: "This could be the biggest moment in British boxing history."