Newspaper headlines: Labour general election leak leads front pages

Jeremy Corbyn Image copyright Getty Images

The leaked draft of Labour's election manifesto is reported in most of the papers, and makes the lead for the Telegraph, Guardian, Mail and Mirror.

The Guardian sums it all up with the headline "Corbyn's plan to nationalise rail, mail and energy firms".

The Sun calls it an "extraordinary socialist blueprint for power".

For the Mail, it is a "socialist manifesto that is red in tooth and claw and dripping with class envy".

The Telegraph says it will "take Britain back to the 1970s".

But the Mirror says the measures are a "bold bid to woo wavering voters fed up with Tory assaults on the poor, disabled, wages, health and education, but who feel Labour have no credible alternative".


For its main story, the Times says relations between the chancellor and Theresa May's top team have deteriorated following a series of clashes over policy and presentation.

The paper has learned that Philip Hammond infuriated senior Downing Street aides by, in effect, committing the prime minister to ditching a promise not to raise VAT, tax or National Insurance, days after she called the election and before the policy had been settled.

According to the paper, both sides have denied reports that Philip Hammond had initially opposed Mrs May's promise to cap energy bills.


The i leads with a warning that the UK is set for a stroke epidemic, with the number of sufferers likely to rise by 44% over the next 20 years.

Image copyright PA

It says a major report has put the predicted increase - one of the biggest in Europe - down to an ageing population as well as "alarming variations in delivering even the basic levels of treatment and care".

The research was carried out by King's College London and published by the Stroke Association and the Stroke Alliance For Europe.


The call by a senior judge earlier this week that elderly couples should not be separated when they need residential care is welcomed in a number of papers.

The Mail says Sir James Munby, head of the Family Division of the High Court, speaks for everyone with a heart.

The Sun finds it hard to believe that couples can be separated but says it happens when officials deem it unsafe for them to stay in their home but have no capacity to put them in care together.

Why did it need a judge to tell social services chiefs that compassion and common sense must prevail over box-ticking, it asks?

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Finally, the Telegraph reports that the humble British lizard could be at risk of extinction from an invasion of more nimble European reptiles that spend their time climbing walls.

Already struggling due to loss of habitat, numbers of the native sand lizard are said to be plummeting in areas where the continental wall lizards have taken hold.

Conservationists tell the paper that as well as out-competing the British lizard for food and space, wall lizards may also be spreading disease - raising fears the native species will be all but wiped out in the same way red squirrels were killed off by foreign grey squirrels.