Wang Quanzhang: The lawyer who simply vanished

  • 22 May 2017
Wang Quanzhang Image copyright Family
Image caption Wang Quanzhang was detained in August 2015 - and hasn't been seen or heard from since

In August 2015 Wang Quanzhang was detained by the Chinese authorities.

In that he was not alone. The nationwide series of raids that summer saw more than 200 lawyers, legal assistants and human rights activists brought in for questioning.

But almost two years on, Mr Wang is the only lawyer from whom nothing has been heard at all.

"I don't know whether he's alive or dead," his wife Li Wenzu told me. "I have had no information at all. He has simply disappeared from the face of the earth. It is so scary, so brutal."

China's "709" crackdown as it's now known - a reference to 9 July, the date it began - is widely seen as a sign of a growing intolerance of dissent under President Xi Jinping.

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media captionLi Wenzu has not heard from her husband Wang Quanzhang since 2015

Read full article Wang Quanzhang: The lawyer who simply vanished

Chinese lawyer 'wore torture device for a month'

  • 13 May 2017
The before and after shots provided by Le Heping's wife Image copyright Wang Qiaoling
Image caption A picture of Mr Li from 2012 and one taken after his release

It's a form of restraint that would be more in keeping with the practices of a medieval dungeon than a modern, civilised state.

But the device - leg and hand shackles linked by a short chain - is a well-documented part of the toolkit that the Chinese police use to break the will of their detainees.

Read full article Chinese lawyer 'wore torture device for a month'

Beijing's unique street life under constant siege

  • 6 May 2017
Beijing workers knocking down small shops
Image caption Beijing workers remodelling the city after knocking down small shops, restaurants, bars

You can't get too attached to things in Beijing. Your favourite restaurant, cafe, bar, park bench, row of trees, basketball court could be there one day and obliterated the next.

The current wave of destruction in the Chinese capital is working its way through the back streets where bars and restaurants are being 拆-ed (Chai-ed as the Chinese would say) because they are said to be lacking the correct building approvals.

Read full article Beijing's unique street life under constant siege

Chinese anger over 'acid pollution' images

  • 26 April 2017
Aerial view of polluted land in Nanzhaofu in Dacheng county, Hebei

Recent aerial photographs of extensive pollution at industrial sites in northern China have caused a public outcry, and calls for action from the authorities.

The images, taken by a drone, show a cluster of dark red and rust-coloured pits occupying a big patch of land in a village called Nanzhaofu in Hebei province.

Read full article Chinese anger over 'acid pollution' images

China laps up glossy TV corruption drama

  • 8 April 2017
Promotional image for Chinese TV show In the Name of the People Image copyright Weibo/In the Name of the People
Image caption The TV show stars Chinese heart-throb Lu Yi (second from left)

A dashing detective bursts into a secret villa and uncovers huge stacks of cash stuffed in fridges, closets and beds. Meanwhile, the villa's owner - a government official - crawls on the floor and begs for his life.

This is the dramatic opening scene in China's latest hit TV show, In the Name of the People, which made its high-profile debut last month.

Read full article China laps up glossy TV corruption drama

China's political propaganda gets a digital makeover

  • 14 March 2017
The annual National People's Congress at Beijing's Great Hall of the People, 5 March Image copyright AP
Image caption More than 3,000 representatives gather at the congress

China has been trying and failing for years to get its people, especially its young people, to care about its political system. Could it now be close to working out how to do just this?

Every March, the National People Congress (NPC), China's biggest annual political event, goes virtually unnoticed by the vast majority of the Chinese people.

Read full article China's political propaganda gets a digital makeover

China fuels anger over Seoul's missile move

  • 13 March 2017
Chinese people stand outside a closed Lotte store in Jilin, in Jilin province, China, on March 9, 2017. Image copyright AFP
Image caption South Korean retailer Lotte has seen closures of some Chinese stores over the US missile deployment row

The deployment in South Korea of the US Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (Thaad) missile defence system has been slammed by Beijing. Now the Chinese Communist Party is calling on its people to embrace their ill will towards their neighbours.

It's incredible the speed with which China's leaders can just switch on anti-South Korea sentiment here.

Read full article China fuels anger over Seoul's missile move

Living loud in China's lively public spaces

  • 11 March 2017
Cafe in China with a woman holding her head in her hands in front of a Bible, and a man on his mobile phone in front of his laptop.
Image caption Little chance of a quiet cuppa in some Beijing cafes

There are some societies where people are expected to avoid being noisy in public and they behave accordingly. Then there's China.

This country that I love is many things, but quiet is not one of them.

Read full article Living loud in China's lively public spaces

Long Zhenyang: The resignation that shook Hong Kong media

  • 18 February 2017
Long Zhenyang

Until a few weeks ago, Long Zhenyang held one of the top media jobs in south China.

He was the assistant chief editor of the Hong Kong Commercial Daily, one of three pro-Beijing newspapers in the Chinese territory.

Read full article Long Zhenyang: The resignation that shook Hong Kong media

Why Chinese people won't boycott Trump fashion

  • 15 February 2017
A model walks in front of the audience at a Taoray Wang show. Left-right: Marla Maples, Tiffany Trump, Ross Mechanic and others. February 11, 2017 in New York City, USA. Image copyright Magnum Photos
Image caption Shunned by some at New York Fashion Week, Ms Trump was welcome at Tao Wang's show

In a week that saw a political storm after Nordstrom dropped Ivanka Trump fashion lines and reports in the US media that her younger sister Tiffany Trump was "shunned" at New York Fashion Week, there was one unlikely win for the first family.

Headlines like "Tiffany Trump is having an awkward time at New York Fashion Week" only served as a reminder that several high-profile designers have been very public in their boycott of the Trump family.

Read full article Why Chinese people won't boycott Trump fashion