Go Figure: The week in numbers

  • 3 July 2015

Look back at the week in numbers with our Go Figure images, which are posted daily on social media.

Monday: Three decades on Boris Becker's age record at Wimbledon remains unbroken.

Tuesday: Can the decline in the recorded music industry be turned round by Spotify and Apple?

Wednesday: What life is like for some of the world's poorest people?

Thursday: Saudi prince donates his entire $32bn fortune to charitable causes.

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10 things we didn't know last week

  • 3 July 2015

1. People with blue eyes are more likely to have an alcohol addiction.

Find out more (Huffington Post)

Read full article 10 things we didn't know last week

Weekend Edition: The week's best reads

  • 3 July 2015
Brenda portrait

A collection of some of the best features from the BBC News website this week, with an injection of your comments.

"Wow, what a story! Amazing story of overcoming life's adversity," posted Grace Berino. Brenda was raped, shot and stabbed during 25 years working as a prostitute. She started at the age of 14, by which time she'd already had two children, and continued until one day she was thrown out of a car by a customer. She was dragged along the ground, tearing all the skin off her face and the side of her body. A spell in the emergency room and a visit to social services would lead her to spend nearly two years in a safe house. "I got Brenda back," she says. Now she helps young women try to avoid the life she says she was lucky to survive.

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Caption Challenge: Basket spectacle

  • 2 July 2015
Cat and dog at the Thailand International Dog Show

Winning entries in the Caption Challenge.

The competition is now closed.

Read full article Caption Challenge: Basket spectacle

The Vocabularist: How did 'silo' get to mean something else?

  • 30 June 2015
Grain silos in Kansas
The metaphor of silos - tall, grand, side-by-side yet sealed off- for a kind of business organisation is a very graphic one.

People used to know of two main kinds of silos - for grain and for missiles - but now it's used in a very different way, writes Trevor Timpson.

Radio listeners may have been startled to hear a director of Christian Aid say that debates on world poverty and the environment were "two silo kind of arguments".

Read full article The Vocabularist: How did 'silo' get to mean something else?

10 things we didn't know last week

  • 26 June 2015

1. Marvel Comics stipulates that Peter Parker must be white and straight but Spider-Man can be of any ethnicity or sexual orientation.

Find out more (Washington Post)

Read full article 10 things we didn't know last week

Go Figure: The week in numbers

  • 26 June 2015

Look back at the week in numbers with our Go Figure images, which are posted daily on social media.

Monday: Jurassic World takes a second T-Rex-sized bite of the US box office

Read full article Go Figure: The week in numbers

Weekend Edition: The week's best reads

  • 26 June 2015
White Horse Village

A collection of some of the best features from the BBC News website this week, with an injection of your comments.

"This was a really poignant feature... Carrie is an incredibly talented author," posted Benjamin Chason-Sokol. Xiao Zhang grew up in a village in China which has now been completely transformed. A city now stands where once there were fields. Does she miss it? Not at all. She says the change liberated her. "There's nothing I enjoyed about farming. It was hard labour and I don't miss that for a moment." In the latest of our immersive long-form stories told using pictures, video and text, we look at modern China through the eyes of one very determined woman.

Read full article Weekend Edition: The week's best reads

Caption Challenge: Bendy truck

  • 25 June 2015
Truck by Erwin Wurm

Winning entries in the Caption Challenge.

The competition is now closed.

Read full article Caption Challenge: Bendy truck

The Vocabularist: The roots of the word 'eurosceptic'

  • 23 June 2015
Man at pro-European demonstration in Athens
Man at pro-European demonstration in Athens

With possible Greek and British exits from the European Union constantly in the news, we find the British word "eurosceptic" has a rich Greek heritage.

Europa (or Europe, pronounced you-ropey) in Greek mythology was a princess from Tyre in modern Lebanon who was kidnapped and taken to Crete.

Read full article The Vocabularist: The roots of the word 'eurosceptic'