Go Figure: The week in numbers

  • 6 May 2016

Look back at the week in numbers with our Go Figure images, which are posted daily on social media.

Tuesday: 10 things bookies thought more likely than Leicester winning the Premier League

Wednesday: Fat Labradors give clues to obesity epidemic

Friday: 'Boaty McBoatface' polar ship named after Attenborough

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Go Figure: The week in numbers

  • 29 April 2016

Look back at the week in numbers with our Go Figure images, which are posted daily on social media.

Monday: Ford: 'We assume Apple is working on a car'

Read full article Go Figure: The week in numbers

10 things we didn't know last week

  • 26 February 2016
Image copyright Science Photo Library

1. Some Tinder users don't recognise serial killers and swipe right.

Find out more

Read full article 10 things we didn't know last week

Go Figure: The week in numbers

  • 26 February 2016

Look back at the week in numbers with our Go Figure images, which are posted daily on social media.

Monday: How do you turn box office gold into a record-breaking flop?

Read full article Go Figure: The week in numbers

The Vocabularist: How target once meant shield

  • 23 February 2016
Arrows on target Image copyright iStock

Boris Johnson was last week described as the "top target" for Brexit campaigners to front their campaign. But what are the roots of the word target?

Measures are said to target cancer cells or domestic abuse, while overseas aid can be targeted at those who most deserve it. Reaching a target means success in military and business terms, but setting targets in fields such as health or education invites controversy. Where does the word come from?

Read full article The Vocabularist: How target once meant shield

Weekend Edition: The week's best reads

  • 19 February 2016
Balkissa Chaibou
Image caption Balkissa Chaibou now feels a sense of responsibility to her family

A collection of some of the best features from the BBC News website this week, with an injection of your comments.

"Such an inspiring story: reminds me to be grateful," commented Felicity Taylor. Balkissa Chaibou dreamed of becoming a doctor, but when she was 12 she learned she had been promised as a bride to her cousin, which would have meant an end to her studies. Being one of five daughters, her family in Niger may have seen the decision as financially sensible, but Chaibou took her parents to court to fight for her rights.

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10 things we didn't know last week

  • 19 February 2016
Image copyright iStock

1. Half of the world's population could be short-sighted by 2050.

Find out more (Science Daily)

Read full article 10 things we didn't know last week

Go Figure: The week in numbers

  • 19 February 2016

Look back at the week in numbers with our Go Figure images, which are posted daily on social media.

Image copyright Getty Images

Monday: Can Kanye West look closer to home before seeking investment from Zuckerberg?

Image copyright Reuters

Read full article Go Figure: The week in numbers

The Vocabularist: Grotesque wasn't always an insult

  • 16 February 2016
Decoration in the Domus Aurea, Rome Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Many artists and others were lowered in to see the decorations in the "grottoes"

In recent days an opponent of Hillary Clinton was accused of "grotesque misogyny" while the lack of broadband in rural areas was branded a "grotesque problem". But the word didn't always mean something bad, writes Trevor Timpson.

Grotesque is one of those words which people making public statements reach for when ordinary insults just will not do. But it was not always an insult.

Read full article The Vocabularist: Grotesque wasn't always an insult

Weekend Edition: The week's best reads

  • 12 February 2016
Fairey Rotodyne in action Image copyright Getty Images

A collection of some of the best features from the BBC News website this week, with an injection of your comments.

"Good story," tweeted The Aviation Historian. The Rotodyne was once described as a "new way of flying" and the Government had hoped it would become a mass mode of transport. After much tinkering, it first flew abroad to Paris from Heathrow, via Dover and Brussels, in June 1959. However, the half-helicopter, half-plane never really took off and it was scrapped in 1962.

Read full article Weekend Edition: The week's best reads