Samsung's Galaxy tablet computer pulled from show

  • 5 September 2011
  • From the section Business

Samsung Electronics will not promote its new tablet computer at one of the world's largest electronics shows after sales of the product were blocked in Germany.

The new Galaxy Tab 7.7 was pulled out of the IFA electronics fair in Berlin.

On Friday a Dusseldorf court granted a request from Apple to ban Samsung from selling the product in Germany.

The two rivals are locked in a global patent war over their smartphone and tablet products.

"Samsung respects the court's decision... and therefore decided not to display any more the Galaxy Tab 7.7 in the IFA," the company said in a statement, according to AFP news agency.

The new court injunction comes after a temporary ban on sales in Germany of another Samsung product - the Galaxy Tab 10.1 - by the court in August.

Ongoing battle

Apple claims that South Korea's Samsung has infringed its patents with the Galaxy line of smartphones and tablet computers.

It argues Samsung copied the design, look and feel of Apple's popular iPhone and iPad devices.

Samsung has counter-sued Apple, saying it infringed Samsung's wireless patents.

The two companies have been fighting legal battles in the US, Europe, South Korea and Australia since April.

In Australia, Samsung has already been forced to delay the introduction of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 twice.

Galaxy Tab

Samsung was planning on displaying its Galaxy Tab 7.7, as well as other new devices, at this year's IFA.

The electronics fair is one of the most important showcases for companies looking to attract European consumers.

The injunction means it will miss out on the opportunity.

However, Samsung said it would take "all available measures, including legal options" to maintain its presence in the European market.

A company spokesman was quoted by AFP as saying that the court ruling "severely limits consumer choice in Germany".

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