Barclays scandal: Key players

The Barclays rate-fixing scandal has forced a number of high-level resignations and questions are now being asked about how widespread the practice was, and whether the Bank of England and senior Whitehall figures knew what was happening.

Key players

Name Most recent job/position Connection to rate-fixing scandal
Bob Diamond

Bob Diamond

Chief executive, Barclays

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Mr Diamond said he was stepping down because external pressure on the bank risked "damaging the franchise". Barclays released Mr Diamond's note of a conversation at the end of October 2008 with the Bank of England's Paul Tucker, after which the bank's Libor postings fell. He has been succeeded as chief executive by Antony Jenkins.

Marcus Agius

Marcus Agius

Chairman, Barclays

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Mr Agius said the bank's behaviour was unacceptable, but as chairman the buck stopped with him and he should stand aside. He has been replaced by Sir David Walker, a respected banker who led the 2009 government inquiry into the rules governing how banks are run.

Jerry del Missier

Jerry del Missier

Chief operating officer, Barclays

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One of the most senior executives at Barclays who gave instructions to lower Libor rates after being told of the phone call between Mr Diamond and Paul Tucker. Told MPs he was only acting on instructions. Resigned after Barclays revealed his role.

Paul Tucker

Paul Tucker

Deputy governor, Bank of England

Mr Diamond's notes show Mr Tucker called him to say "senior Whitehall figures" were asking why Barclays was always towards the top end of Libor pricing. When told not all banks were providing accurate quotes, Mr Tucker is said to have replied: "Oh, that would be worse". Says he did not lean on Barclays to reduce its rates and was not asked by the government to do so.

Sir Jeremy Heywood

Sir Jeremy Heywood

Cabinet secretary

Paul Tucker told the Treasury Select Committee that one of the senior Whitehall officials was Sir Jeremy Heywood. The two exchanged emails at the height of the financial crisis in October 2008, in which Sir Jeremy expressed government concern about why Barclays' Libor rates were so high.

Lord Turner

Lord Turner

Chairman, Financial Services Authority (FSA)

The Financial Services Authority investigated the Libor manipulation at Barclays and continues to look into what happened at other banks. Barclays staff contacted the FSA in 2007 and 2008 to tell them the bank's Libor submissions were wrong. As a result, the regulator is accused of being "asleep at the wheel".

Sir Mervyn King

Sir Mervyn King

Governor, Bank of England

Sir Mervyn faces accusations of ignoring warnings from the New York Federal Reserve back in 2008 about problems with Libor. Sir Mervyn says there was no evidence of wrongdoing at the time. After the scandal broke, he and Lord Turner made it clear to Barclays that Bob Diamond should stand down, not Mr Agius.

David Green QC

David Green QC

Director, Serious Fraud Office

The SFO is considering whether to bring criminal charges against individuals who tried to manipulate Libor. Mr Green is under pressure to bring successful criminal prosecutions, especially given criticism of the SFO's conviction rates and concerns that fines from regulators do not go far enough.

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