US jobs growth lower than expected in January

people queuing

Related Stories

The US economy added 113,000 jobs in January, the second month in a row the figure has been weaker than expected.

Economists had predicted the US Labor Department would report an increase of about 180,000 new jobs.

However, the unemployment rate fell to 6.6%, the lowest level since October 2008.

The jobless figures will raise concerns that, after strong growth in the second half of 2013, the US economic recovery is beginning to lose its steam.

US stock markets shrugged off the news - with shares on Wall Street rising in early trading.

Analysis

A disappointment but not a disaster, was how one American economist put it. 113,000 is certainly rather disappointing.

The workforce and the population in the US are growing so the economy needs to add new jobs to keep up.

How many is uncertain, but the most recent figure is in the range of economists' estimates.

In short, the US could do with faster job creation to get unemployment down and entice back the people who have given up looking for work. Those people are not counted as unemployed.

For sure, the unemployment rate is a lot better than in the dark days of the recession: 6.6% of the workforce now down from a peak of 10% in 2009.

But here's another important figure, the percentage of the population (over 16 years old) in work: between 62% and 63.4% in the years before the crisis, but below 59% now.

Getting America back to work is unfinished business.

The unemployment rate is calculated from a different survey to the jobs figure - known as non-farm payrolls. The rate is based on a survey of households, while the jobs figure is based on a survey of employers.

December's surprisingly weak payrolls figure was revised up only modestly to 75,000, from 74,000.

The construction industry, most vulnerable to the impact of bad weather, added 48,000 jobs in January, indicating that while the weather may have been responsible for December's weak figures, it does not appear to have been a factor in January.

Manufacturing hiring also picked up, adding 21,000 jobs.

Another positive factor from the report was that more Americans started looking for, and found, work.

But there were declines in hiring in retail, utilities, government, and education and health employment.

'Ugly headline'

Earlier this week, an unexpectedly weak manufacturing report raised concerns about the strength of the US economy and sent the Dow Jones tumbling by 326 points.

However, analysts were not too despondent about the latest numbers.

"We think the employment market is improving, but will do so in fits and starts," said David Carter from Lenox Wealth Advisors immediately after the numbers were released.

"Today, the ugly headline number will negatively impact markets, but there are enough positive indications that ultimately the market will move higher over time."

A woman with coat and scarf on The cold weather in the US may have hurt December's figure

Joe Manimbo, senior market analyst at Western Union Business, said: "It is an improvement but a number this soft does feed worries about slowing US growth. The report fans uncertainty about the Federal Reserve's next move.

"Anyone looking for an alibi can point to the weather; it does not derail hopes of faster US growth and further Fed tapering," he added.

'Thoughtful people'

But one of the members of the Federal Reserve, Richard Fisher, told the broadcaster CNBC that the bank wouldn't be swayed by one month's numbers, blaming the weather for the weak report.

"I will say this about the rest of our committee, they are not swayed by a single number. They are thoughtful people," he said.

The US Federal Reserve has started withdrawing its extra support from the economy - a process known as tapering - after judging that the economy was improving, citing stronger jobs growth as one of the factors.

The central bank had been spending $85bn a month buying bonds, but has now reduced that to $65bn a month.

The unemployment rate is now very close to 6.5% - the level at which the Fed said it would start to consider an increase in interest rates, although most analysts agree a rate rise is still a long way off.

More on This Story

Related Stories

From other news sites

* May require registration or subscription

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More Business stories

RSS

BBC Business Live

  1.  
    06:47: GERMAN GROWTH BBC Radio 4

    Christian Schultz, senior economist at Berenberg Bank, tells the Today programme Germany needs to work on its infrastructure, but even if it started to work on inward investment now the effects would not be felt for several years. This as more political pressure builds on Germany to act to avert another eurozone crisis. But German inward investment doesn't solve the problem, he says. "How does Germany fixing some bridges make French and Italian entrepreneurs invest more?"

     
  2.  
    06:34: STORM POWER
    storm

    The UK's wind farms generated more power than its nuclear power stations on Tuesday, the National Grid says. The energy network operator said it was caused by a combination of high winds and faults in nuclear plants. Wind made up 14.2% of all generation and nuclear offered 13.2%. As BBC environment analyst Roger Harrabin reports, for a 24-hour period yesterday, spinning blades produced more energy than splitting atoms.

     
  3.  
    06:24: CITY POWERS Radio 5 live

    On things like transport and education, local government can make better decisions, says Alexandra Jones, chief executive of the Centre for Cities, which does independent research and policy analysis on UK city economies on 5 live. "Whatever you're doing in a city, you have to balance the books, though, she says. Competitiveness on tax becomes a "race to the bottom" she adds.

     
  4.  
    06:13: CITY POWERS Radio 5 live

    "I think there's real momentum... this is the biggest opportunity in decades to transport the relationship with local government," says Mr Wakefield on 5 live. The debate for Scottish independence shows there are a lot of people interested in local powers, he adds.

     
  5.  
    06:04: CITY POWERS Radio 5 live

    Allowing UK cities to make their own decisions on tax and spending could boost economic growth by £79bn a year by 2030, a year-long study has concluded. "More people want local powers in Leeds," says Councillor Keith Wakefield, leader of Leeds City Council on Radio 5 live. He thinks councils can target some spending more efficiently.

     
  6.  
    06:01: Howard Mustoe Business reporter

    Good morning! Get in touch via email at bizlivepage@bbc.co.uk or on twitter @BBCBusiness

     
  7.  
    06:00: Matthew West Business reporter

    Morning all. We have the latest minutes from the Bank of England's September Monetary Policy Committee meeting at 09:30; Argos and Homebase owner Home Retail Group publishes interim results before that and there are trading updates from GlaxoSmithKline, British American Tobacco and Everything Everywhere. We'll bring you it all as it happens.

     

Features

From BBC Capital

Programmes

  • Smart glassesClick Watch

    Smart spectacles go into battle – the prototypes looking to take on Google Glass

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.