The future of business news

Linda Yueh

This is my last blog here, as I've decided to leave my post as the BBC's Chief Business Correspondent based in Singapore and move back to the UK.

My move has set me thinking about the future of business news. There are two words that sum that up: global and digital.

First let us consider global. Businesses are increasingly organised so that their supply chains and markets extend across national borders. This means that events which happen in one part of the world can have important effects on businesses everywhere.

So, it is vital for business journalists to steer away from closed-economy thinking. Understanding and explaining the connections between consumers, producers, and policymakers in different countries is now essential to covering the beat.

Second, we are in the midst of a digital revolution when it comes to the way news is reported and delivered to audiences. I am not predicting that the end of TV and radio listings is right around the corner, but viewers increasingly want to watch and listen at a time when they want to.

I found this with my own programme, Talking Business with Linda Yueh, where many UK viewers watched via BBC iPlayer. Outside the UK, where the BBC's on demand service was not available, the programme had multiple showings through the week.

It is inevitable that this trend will continue. The challenge for business reporting in the digital age, though, goes beyond simply making content more easily available online to suit viewer habits.

The prevalence of social media and the internet combined with smart phones mean that people have a huge amount of information available at their fingertips. News audiences are now more informed than ever before, especially in business. When news is reported in mainstream media, for many it is no longer new. Personally, I often find news items from social media and other online sources faster than traditional ones.

Therefore, business news should look to add value for its audience in terms of relevant and rigorous analysis rather than just the reporting of events. It should be a trusted source among the many sources of information from which the viewer can choose.

Being global and digital are what I have tried to achieve in the last two years.

This may be my last blog here. But look for my posts elsewhere on the BBC website as I will continue to pen pieces that accompany programmes as a freelance presenter.

And readers of this blog know that I will always alert them to a new post via social media.