Will Wikitribune help combat fake news?

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Media captionJimmy Wales has launched Wikitribune: a crowd-sourced news website

Jimmy Wales has launched Wikitribune: a crowd-sourced news website full of high-quality impartial news (eventually).

Here's my take:

Jimmy Wales's interest in news media is nothing new. For years he has expressed concern about how to guarantee the future of quality journalism, and even been talked of as a potential investor in existing media companies.

But when I spoke to him yesterday, it was clear that there was something new - or rather three things - that finally turned his long-standing interest into the reality of Wikitribune.

The first is what we call fake news. Fake news is a multi-faceted thing, and not altogether new; but it is undoubtedly the case that the deliberate, viral spreading of misinformation, either for commercial or political ends, has radically spiked around some of the big news events of the past year. Moreover, efforts to tackle it have often been pathetic thus far, and less often successful. This really irks Wales, and quite right too.

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Two visions for the future of media

A multi-billionaire donates $100m to investigative journalism and hacks everywhere ask "where do I apply?".

Is this what the future of media looks like?

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Channel 4 and BBC: Changes ahead

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Media captionAmol Rajan looks at changes on the way for Channel 4 and the BBC

Change is coming to British broadcasting - including, probably, a change of location. Indeed, location, location, location was the theme of this year's Nations & Regions Media Conference in Salford.

Culture Secretary Karen Bradley made clear that she thinks Channel 4 could better serve the public if it moved some or all of its operations out of London. And Sharon White, the Chief Executive of Ofcom, explained how the regulator will scrutinise the BBC from next week. An important day in Britain's quickly evolving broadcast industry.

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Alastair Campbell returns to newspapers

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Image caption The appointment of Alastair Campbell seems to point towards a growing pro-Remain confidence

Alastair Campbell is returning to British newspapers as editor-at-large of The New European.

Almost a quarter of a century after he left the Daily Mirror to work for Tony Blair, Campbell will write regular columns and, like all editors-at-large, become an ambassador for the product, I have learned.

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What is the function of an editor?

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Image caption George Osborne will take over as editor of the London Evening Standard

Editing a newspaper is an extremely rewarding and tough job, probably harder these days than a few decades ago, because of scarcity of resources and the demands of the internet.

But being an editor isn't just an editorial job.

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George Osborne: From history buff to austerity editor

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George Osborne is a history buff at heart.

A student of modern history in his undergraduate days at Oxford, his is that cast of mind with a tendency to see himself as the inheritor of distant traditions.

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Osborne job 'a remarkable move'

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George Osborne's appointment as Editor of the London Evening Standard is a remarkable move that will dazzle the worlds of politics and media.

The former Chancellor will continue as MP for Tatton for the foreseeable future while taking the top chair at London's afternoon paper, as I exclusively revealed on Friday.

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BBC School Report: What I learned

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Media captionTony Hall was questioned by young reporters about Dr Who and losing Bake Off

This week, I had the utterly terrifying experience of speaking to three very smart people who want my job and are much better qualified for it than me.

Alex, 12, Yusuf, 14, and Rima, 14, interviewed Tony Hall, the director general of the BBC, as part of BBC School Report, an initiative encouraging 11- to 16-year-olds to broadcast their own news.

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Do the technology giants finally face a backlash?

Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg
Image caption Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg: a shared philosophy

It is perhaps the most beguiling irony of our age that a new class of super-rich that has emerged on America's West Coast has its moral, intellectual and even spiritual origins in the anti-materialistic radicalism of 1960s counter-culture.

Silicon Valley is what happened when the flower power generation sobered up.

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Fox and Sky: Is this time different?

Culture Secretary Karen Bradley has said she is "minded to" refer the bid by 21st Century Fox for the 61% of Sky it doesn't own to Ofcom, the regulator.

I am minded to be wary of ministers who adopt strong stances on issues while deferring decisions to other people - but more of that later.

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