What will the industry make of star pay?

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Media captionWhy the gender pay gap could mean problems for the BBC

If you ask experienced people in the world of broadcasting what they think of these salary disclosures, three clear and consistent points are apparent.

First, the BBC pays below - and sometimes much below - market rates, both at management level and in terms of top broadcasting talent.

Second, this move will prove inflationary. Those on the list will think to themselves: "Why is that inferior presenter getting paid more than me?" - and will demand a pay rise.

Third, if you thought it was tin hat time for the talent, pity the poor agents they work with.

All over the land talent agents are being exposed either for having exaggerated what certain people are paid - in order to get a good deal for their client - or having several clients who do similar roles but at wildly different pay. Ouch.

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Are the Murdochs too powerful?

When I said hello to Rupert Murdoch outside the Manhattan headquarters of his media empire last month, he told me he was "not worried at all" about Ofcom.

It turns out his confidence was misplaced, but not for reasons that are simple, or were widely predicted.

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Hateful content: Is the media biased?

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The attack on Muslims at Finsbury Park mosque has prompted a debate about whether the media has inherent biases, and caused a major kerfuffle within Britain's newspapers.

To take just a single example, one person on Twitter said of The Times's front page: "He's white, so let's highlight the fact that he's jobless, a lone wolf and suffered mental health issues."

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Five election lessons for the media

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Media captionThe BBC's media editor Amol Rajan looks at the role played by social media - in shaping the outcome of the 2017 election.

We await better data, of course, but a few days after Theresa May's humiliation at the ballot box it is not too early to say this election was a watershed... for the media.

As many Tories have pointed out, their party increased its share of the vote for the fifth election in a row, something no party has ever done before. What took everyone by surprise was the astonishing surge in support for Jeremy Corbyn's Labour Party.

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Junk news and democracy

Researchers are examining the quality of news shared on Twitter
Image caption Researchers are examining the quality of news shared on Twitter

Researchers at Oxford University have found that the quality of news available to British voters on Twitter is superior to that available to Americans ahead of the election of Donald Trump as president.

The Oxford Internet Institute has also discovered that there have been more tweets about Labour than other political parties so far in the campaign.

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Standard's deputy moves to Mail Online

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Image caption Former Chancellor George Osborne became editor of the Standard earlier this month

There's been a lot of "fair play, George Osborne" on Twitter in recent days, commending him for breaking a series of agenda-setting political stories.

There was the line about how not a single member of the cabinet supports the prime minister's immigration cap, followed by the scoop about her swivel on social care.

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May delights her fans in the press

So it turns out that a prime minister's word isn't always sacrosanct - because, after all, he or she won't be in No 10 forever.

Victims of press abuse in Britain believe they were given a cast-iron guarantee that the second stage of the Leveson Inquiry, which would look at corporate governance at Rupert Murdoch's News International as well as the relationship between Britain's press and the police, would definitely go ahead.

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Gordon Brown calls for 'Leveson 2'

I can reveal that Gordon Brown has written to Culture Secretary Karen Bradley, arguing that his experience of the new press regulator IPSO strengthens the case for a second stage of the Leveson Inquiry.

The former Prime Minister had a complaint upheld against The Daily Telegraph, concerning his expenses. The paper re-published an old heading, "The Truth About the Cabinet Expenses", together with a picture of Brown and his brother.

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Rupert Murdoch gives robust response to BBC questions

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Media captionThe media mogul was leaving work in Manhattan, New York

As Ofcom explores whether Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox should be allowed to press on with its planned takeover of Sky, we thought the company might agree to an interview with the BBC. But they said no.

So we paid Rupert Murdoch a surprise visit at his headquarters in Manhattan.

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BBC election debates: A decent result?

Image caption Leaders of opposition parties took part in a televised debate during the 2015 general election campaign

Henry Kissinger is said to have remarked, when asked why university politics is so vicious, that it was "precisely because the stakes are so small". In some academic circles, this is updated to: "Because the stakes are so small and the egos so big".

When it comes to TV debates ahead of British elections, both the egos and the stakes are massive. This makes negotiations fraught. It is impossible to keep all of the people happy all of the time, and the incentives never align: Popular parties, especially if they are in government, would rather avoid them, so as to keep tight control of their message; but insurgents feel it is a moment to receive equal footing with those in power, and so look leaderly.

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