Is Mike Pence distancing himself from Trump?

Mike Pence stands behind Donald Trump. Image copyright Getty Images

In the White House game of thrones, where senior administration officials fend off adversaries at every turn while vying for power and prominence, Mike Pence has been a relatively quiet player.

The vice-president is always in the background, often looking over Donald Trump's shoulder with an approving nod as the president delivers a speech or signs yet another executive order. When it comes to engaging in the bare-knuckle brawling that has played itself out through anonymous sources and well-timed insider leaks, however, the vice-president and his associates have largely stayed out of the fray.

Thursday night, then, was quite unusual. Two major US media outlets - CNN and NBC News - ran articles, complete with quotes from anonymous White House sources, distancing the vice-president from the current chaos in the administration and the running controversy over possible Trump campaign ties to the Russian government during the 2016 US presidential election.

"We certainly knew we needed to be prepared for the unconventional," an unnamed Pence aide told CNN's Elizabeth Landers, but "not to this extent".

The proximate cause for the concern among the vice-president's camp was a New York Times article earlier this week reporting that Michael Flynn, Mr Trump's prominent campaign surrogate and short-lived national security adviser, had in early January informed the presidential transition team - then headed by Mr Pence - that he was under investigation for his ties to the Turkish government.

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Roger Ailes and the dawn of hyper-partisan television

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Roger Ailes revolutionised cable news in the US, creating the hyper-partisan, opinion-based environment that currently dominates the American media landscape.

It's probably fitting, then, that the responses to the death of the man who founded conservative media behemoth Fox News have been sharply divided along partisan lines.

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How damaging is 'Comey memo' for Trump?

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The White House has denied a report that President Donald Trump tried to persuade the FBI to end its investigation into former aide Michael Flynn.

It's not the only Trump crisis of the last 24 hours, coming hard on the heels of the news that the president shared sensitive material with Russian diplomats.

The bombshell memo and the 'I' word

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How the White House Comey story collapsed

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Media captionHow the White House's story on Comey collapsed

On Thursday afternoon Donald Trump sat down with NBC's Lester Holt. The firing of FBI Director James Comey featured prominently among the topics discussed.

Breaking news flashes, headlines and controversy ensued.

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Did President Trump fire James Comey as part of a cover-up?

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Media captionTrump's love-hate relationship with Comey over a tumultuous year

Donald Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey caught Washington by complete surprise. No-one - in Congress, in conservative circles, even in the FBI itself - seemingly had an inkling of what was in store.

As politicians and pundits survey the fallout, here are a few of the big questions they are likely to contemplate.

Was it a cover-up?

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Five big consequences of Trumpcare win

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Obamacare repeal lives to see another day, thanks to a concerted effort on the part of the White House and Republican leadership in Congress over the past few weeks.

Passage of the American Health Care Act in the House of Representatives is just round one in a much longer battle, but there's no denying that Thursday's vote will have significant, lasting consequences.

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Deconstructing Comey's testimony on Clinton emails

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Media captionComey explains why he went public reopening Clinton email probe

FBI Director James Comey has revisited his fateful decision to write a letter informing Congress that he was reopening the investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server less than two weeks before November's presidential election.

According to political analyst Nate Silver, the Comey letter "probably" cost the former secretary of state the presidential election - a view recently endorsed by Mrs Clinton herself.

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Hillary Clinton joins the 'Trump resistance'

Hillary Clinton Image copyright Reuters

The election may be over, with Donald Trump's presidency more than 100 days old, but Hillary Clinton isn't ready to let go.

In a brief but frank interview with foreign affairs reporter Christiane Amanpour at the Women for Women International event in New York City on Tuesday, Mrs Clinton said that she has conducted an "excruciating analysis" of her failed presidential campaign as part of a book she is writing.

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What will happen next in Trump presidency? Reply hazy

"cannot predict now"
Image caption What will happen for the rest of Trump's presidency? You might as well ask a Magic Eight ball

The first 100 days of Donald Trump's presidency are now behind him. Time for a deep breath, a quick review and then a look ahead.

As I explained last week, the results so far are decidedly mixed. While there has been a paucity of legislative achievements, Mr Trump has notched some successes through executive action, particularly in the realm of immigration enforcement and regulatory rollback.

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Has Trump kept his campaign promises?

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Media captionDonald Trump: First 100 days in 100 of his own words

Determining a presidency's success by inspecting its "first hundred days" is a bit of an artificial construct. If humans were born with 12 fingers, then perhaps we'd be evaluating presidents based on their first 144 days instead. If the Earth rotated a bit more slowly, then presidents would have more time to notch accomplishments.

Then again, 100 days is plenty of time to get a rough handle on the shape and thrust of a presidency - and to evaluate what kind of progress a leader has made toward fulfilling campaign promises.

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