Has Trump kept his campaign promises?

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Media captionDonald Trump: First 100 days in 100 of his own words

Determining a presidency's success by inspecting its "first hundred days" is a bit of an artificial construct. If humans were born with 12 fingers, then perhaps we'd be evaluating presidents based on their first 144 days instead. If the Earth rotated a bit more slowly, then presidents would have more time to notch accomplishments.

Then again, 100 days is plenty of time to get a rough handle on the shape and thrust of a presidency - and to evaluate what kind of progress a leader has made toward fulfilling campaign promises.

The first 100 days of Donald Trump's presidency have been anything but boring or slow, but how much of it was sound and fury and how much entailed real action?

Here's a quick review of some of the peaks and valleys.


Image copyright Getty Images

The wall

Let's start with the wall - not the president's only promise, but certainly one of his oldest, most high-profile ones. Candidate Trump constantly spoke of the great wall that he plans to build along the US-Mexico border at his campaign rallies, and the crowd roared in agreement when he said Mexico would pay for the project.

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Trump makes a French election prediction

Donald Trump talks at the White House. Image copyright Getty Images

On Friday morning Donald Trump dipped his presidential toe into French electoral politics, tweeting about the possible impact of the Paris shooting on Thursday that resulted in one police officer dead and two seriously wounded.

"Another terrorist attack in Paris," Mr Trump wrote. "The people of France will not take much more of this. Will have a big effect on presidential election!"

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Decoding the Trump 'war room' photograph

Trump and team Image copyright White House/BBC
Image caption Back row from left: Deputy chief of staff Joe Hagin, senior adviser Jared Kushner, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Sean Spicer, President Trump, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, chief strategist Steve Bannon, senior adviser Stephen Miller, national security official Michael Anton. Front from left: Chief of staff Reince Priebus, national security adviser HR McMaster, chief economic adviser Gary Cohn, deputy national security adviser Dina Powell

On Friday morning Sean Spicer tweeted a photograph of Donald Trump and some of his advisers receiving a top secret briefing in Florida on the results of the US missile strike against a Syrian government airfield.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, what does this one tell us?

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Syria strike may signal the end of isolationist Trump

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Media captionHow has Donald Trump's position on Syria changed?

Four years ago, after the Syrian government launched a brutal chemical attack on its own civilians, Donald Trump warned anyone who would listen that the US should refrain from launching retaliatory military strikes.

"[President Barack] Obama must now start focusing on OUR COUNTRY, jobs, healthcare and all of our many problems," he tweeted. "Forget Syria and make America great again!"

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Is Trump now part of the establishment?

Donald Trump poses behind his desk in the Oval Office. Image copyright Getty Images

Donald Trump campaigned for president as the ultimate outsider, promising to unseat a corrupt and atrophied Washington establishment. Now, after two months in office, has he become the establishment? Are Trump and his team the insiders now?

One thing the recent collapse of healthcare reform efforts in the House of Representatives has revealed is just how quickly attitudes and alliances can shift in Washington, DC.

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Trump declares war on party rebels

Donald Trump points during a press event. Image copyright Getty Images

Last week Donald Trump said he was going to "come after" congressman Mark Meadows, the head of the House Freedom Caucus, if he didn't support the American Health Care Act. White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer later said the president was joking.

No one is laughing now.

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How disastrous for Trump is healthcare collapse?

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Media captionIn his own words, Mr Trump explains his doomed effort to repeal Obamacare

How bad was Friday's defeat of the American Health Care Act in the House of Representatives? Bad. Very bad.

After a tumultuous week, it's worth stepping back for a bit of perspective.

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Trump healthcare bill dangles by a thread

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Media captionWill Trump seal the healthcare deal?

It's time for Donald Trump, the man who bills himself as the consummate dealmaker, to flex his negotiating muscle - or else.

The American Health Care Act, which rolls back portions of the Obamacare medical insurance reforms, is scheduled for a vote in the House of Representatives on Friday. The bill was initially scheduled to go before the House on Thursday, but was delayed amid concerns it would not garner enough votes.

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Could FBI investigation into Russia links ensnare Trump?

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Media captionWhat FBI Director Comey said on Trump, Russia and wiretaps

House of Comey, that hit political intrigue show from last year, is back on the airwaves, and this season looks like it's going to be another edge-of-the-seat affair.

Some of the characters have changed, of course. Femme fatale Hillary Clinton and her team of Democratic Party heavies have been replaced by tough-guy Donald Trump and the alt-right gang. Fans will be thrilled to learn, however, that top law-man James Comey is back for another turn in the spotlight.

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Have Republicans forgotten how to govern?

U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) answers questions during his weekly news conference at the U.S. Capitol March 16, 2017 in Washington, DC Image copyright Getty Images

On election day last year, American voters gave the Republicans a powerful gift - unified control of the presidency and Congress for the first time in a decade. But turning a governing majority into enacted policies is proving to be a challenge for a party that spent the past eight years throwing political bombs from the sidelines.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan took to the lectern for a press conference on Thursday morning facing a crisis. The healthcare reform legislation he has tried to shepherd through Congress is in serious peril.

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