Home truths on the High Street for Bank of England boss

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Media captionPupils at All Saints Catholic High School describe what they understand about the economy

Ask a bunch of teenagers about the economy, and they know where their money will go as adults.

Buying a house, a car, and being able to provide for their own children are their priorities for the future.

The Bank of England wants them to be better equipped to make those big financial decisions.

Andy Haldane, the Bank's chief economist, believes financial literacy should be built into the core curriculum early in secondary school.

"There is a huge gulf between the amount of resource and effort put into core literacy and numeracy, which are fundamental, and what we put into economic and financial literacy," he said.

Read full article Home truths on the High Street for Bank of England boss

NUS: 'Working-class students face poverty'

Image caption Selina Anderson

"Sometimes I didn't have money for lunch," says second-year university student Selina Anderson.

Before her son started school, the single mum struggled to pay for the childcare to study full-time.

Read full article NUS: 'Working-class students face poverty'

Why do schools have a massive pay gap?

Overhead shot two men and a women at work Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Teaching staff are largely women but schools are among the employers with the biggest gender pay gaps

Walk into any school and one thing is blindingly obvious.

Teaching remains a largely female profession.

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Teenagers 'need more than GCSEs'

Neil Carberry CBI
Image caption Neil Carberry was at the launch of a new education strategy for the BBC

"A 'Gradgrind' view of preparing people for the workforce is failing."

The managing director of the CBI says he's worried about the emphasis in England's school system on rote learning techniques.

Read full article Teenagers 'need more than GCSEs'

Do commuter students lose out?

Anjum James-Francis Image copyright Anjum James-Francis
Image caption Anjum James-Francis commutes to university from his family home in Birmingham

"It couldn't have worked out any better for me," says Anjum James-Francis.

The 20-year-old is in his third year of being a commuter student at Newman University in Birmingham.

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Creative subjects being squeezed, schools tell BBC

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Media captionArtist Bob and Roberta Smith on why creative subjects are important in schools

Creative arts subjects are being cut back in many secondary schools in England, a BBC survey suggests.

More than 1,200 schools responded - over 40% of secondary schools.

Read full article Creative subjects being squeezed, schools tell BBC

'The kids were left with my dead husband'

Helen Daykin and her daughters Image copyright Helen Daykin
Image caption Helen Daykin and her daughters

A bereaved mother is calling for schools to make extra checks on pupils who do not turn up.

Helen Daykin's little girls spent almost 24 hours with the body of their father after his sudden death.

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'What gives you the right to touch me?'

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Media captionMPs are using the hashtag #StreetHarassment to get women talking about their experiences

MPs want to hear more from women about their experiences of unwanted sexual attention for an inquiry they're calling #StreetHarassment.

The inquiry has taken on a new urgency with a growing challenge to outdated casual assumptions that sexual harassment is nothing more than a "bit of banter" , or even worse, "fun".

Read full article 'What gives you the right to touch me?'

Is parent power driving grammar school expansion?

Henry and Florence with mum Ruth
Image caption Ruth Cornish wants an academically selective education for Henry and Florence

Like many mothers, Ruth Cornish started thinking about choosing secondary schools when her children were eight or nine years old.

She wanted an academically selective school for Henry and Florence.

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The children educated in isolation

Park Avenue Girls' High School Image copyright Google Maps
Image caption Park Avenue Girls' High School in Stoke-on-Trent was rated 'inadequate'

"I don't think anyone would think that you should have to spell out that toilet paper should be available in every toilet."

Amanda Spielman is talking about a recent inspection of a fee paying Muslim girls school where there was also no soap or drinking water for pupils.

Read full article The children educated in isolation