Welsh Labour correct Corbyn after schools gaffe

Paul Flynn MP
Image caption 'My long wait for the meek to inherit the earth may be in sight....' - Paul Flynn.

The Labour conference is over. Jeremy Corbyn told delegates to go back to their constituencies to prepare for a snap election, if not for government.

The leader has had a mixed week. The failure of the Owen Smith challenge left Mr Corbyn's leadership stronger than at the end of the summer than at the beginning. The word 'mandate' featured in many of his speeches and interviews this week.

But he and his allies lost a battle over control of the party's national executive, with the Welsh and Scottish leaders able to appoint a member each to the ruling body. The row made the front page lead in the Morning Star.

'Immigration'

The uneasy truce since the leadership result was declared has been threatened by Mr Corbyn's comments about immigration.

Shadow Home Secretary Andy Burnham told delegates: "This conference must fully face up to this fact: millions of lifelong Labour supporters voted to leave the EU and - let's be honest - voted for change on immigration.

Read full article Welsh Labour correct Corbyn after schools gaffe

Corbyn on Owen Smith's 'great campaign' - and more

Jeremy Corbyn
Image caption 'Carwyn and I get along fine' - Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

I've spent a few minutes with Jeremy Corbyn chewing the fat over his views on (among other things) Welsh Labour, Carwyn Jones and Owen Smith.

He denied that he wanted to block a Welsh Labour seat on Labour's national executive committee.

Read full article Corbyn on Owen Smith's 'great campaign' - and more

Corbyn on Wales, Brexit red lines and Labour in power

David Cornock reporting, watched by Jeremy Corbyn
Image caption An interested observer eavesdrops on my report on 'Welsh Night' at the Labour conference.

Greetings from the Labour conference in Liverpool, where Jeremy Corbyn has spoken at "Welsh night" on the conference fringe.

The day after he was re-elected, the Labour leader talked of learning from his party's record in Wales, where it has been in government for all 17 years since devolution.

Read full article Corbyn on Wales, Brexit red lines and Labour in power

'A happy bunch of Ukippers' - new leader's ambition

Diane James MEP
Image caption 'People [are] being a little bit excited at the moment' - UKIP Leader Diane James on the party's divisions in Wales

I've been talking to the new leader of UKIP.

Diane James has an interesting turn of phrase and is fond of euphemisms. She says she's inherited "a certain amount of disarray in Wales" which she puts down to "people being a little bit excited at the moment".

Read full article 'A happy bunch of Ukippers' - new leader's ambition

Labour's rule changes: what do they mean in Wales?

Alun Michael
Image caption Back to the future: Former First Secretary Alun Michael was one of the first to call for Welsh Labour to be represented on the party's NEC.

As a political anorak, I yield to few in my fascination with the internal rulebook of political parties. I recently spent an enjoyable summer's afternoon ploughing through the constitution of the Welsh Liberal Democrats.

It is easy to dismiss Tuesday's lengthy (8 hours, 24 minutes) meeting of Labour's national executive committee as a festival of navel-gazing, but there is a lot more at stake.

Read full article Labour's rule changes: what do they mean in Wales?

Kirsty Williams: No grammar schools 'on my watch'

Kirsty Williams AM
Image caption 'Grammar schools are a policy based on myth, not evidence'

Greetings from Brighton, where the Liberal Democrat conference certainly looks and feels smaller.

The Lib Dems say they now have more members than they have had for more than a decade but there are certainly fewer hangers-on and corporate exhibitors here than when the Lib Dems were in government at Westminster.

Read full article Kirsty Williams: No grammar schools 'on my watch'

MPs take stock as Wales Bill heads to the Lords

David Cameron and Nick Clegg
Image caption Remember them? Former Prime Minister David Cameron and his deputy Nick Clegg launch the 'St David's Day agreement' on devolution in February 2015

MPs and Westminster hacks are now wondering how they will fill the void in their lives left by the Wales Bill completing its passage through the House of Commons.

For the MPs in Wales, the threat to scrap a quarter of them is concentrating minds. Montgomeryshire MP Glyn Davies, now a parliamentary aide at the Wales Office, was so upset by the proposed demise of his constituency as a single entity that he blogged about it at 3:30am.

Read full article MPs take stock as Wales Bill heads to the Lords

'We were all Iris's children' - peer recalls teacher

Lady Finn of Swansea
Image caption 'I am both honoured and amazed to be here' - Baroness Finn of Swansea.

As MPs ponder a sharp cut in their number, Wales's newest peer has made her maiden speech in the House of Lords - with a tribute to her old comprehensive schoolteacher.

Baroness Finn of Swansea, a former special adviser in David Cameron's government, said she was both "honoured and amazed" to be in the Lords.

Read full article 'We were all Iris's children' - peer recalls teacher

Wales Bill nears the end of its Commons journey

Alun Cairns MP
Image caption 'We're fed up talking about constitutional settlements' - Alun Cairns.

The Wales Bill is nearing the end of its journey through the House of Commons. MPs are currently debating a range of amendments to legislation that is largely unchanged since it was introduced in parliament (although very different from the draft version of the legislation).

Some of the issues are familiar - the issue of a separate legal jurisdiction is occupying MPs at the time of writing. Welsh Secretary Alun Cairns has rejected that proposal despite a Plaid Cymru protest that the Welsh Assembly is the only legislature in the world without a separate jurisdiction.

Read full article Wales Bill nears the end of its Commons journey

Plan to axe Welsh MPs sparks Commons row

Paul Flynn MP
Image caption Paul Flynn: our democracy is degraded and 'heading into further distress'

Welsh MPs are getting their retaliation in first ahead of the publication on September 13 of plans to cut their number by a quarter.

The Boundary Commission for Wales will set out a new parliamentary map of Wales, a Wales with 29 rather than the current 40 MPs.

Read full article Plan to axe Welsh MPs sparks Commons row