Theresa May's Brexit Welsh powers pledge

Alun Cairns MP
Image caption Alun Cairns: 'Maintaining membership of the single market is effectively remaining part of the European Union by another name'

"The economic argument trumps everything else," said the secretary of state. "At the end of the day this is down to the economy, jobs, jobs, jobs."

There were, he said, 100,000 jobs in Wales directly linked to our place in Europe. "Business leaders tell me that they rely on our links with a market of 500 million people - that's a vast trading bloc that takes more than 40 per cent of the goods we export."

Indeed, the Conservative manifesto for the 2015 general election declared: "We benefit from the single market".

That was then, and this is Alun Cairns now: "Maintaining membership of the single market is effectively remaining part of the European Union by another name. Instead, we seek the greatest possible access to the single market through a new comprehensive, bold and ambitious free trade agreement."

'Recession'

The referendum changed everything and ministers who warned before June 23 last year that Brexit risked "the very real prospect of recession" are now making optimistic noises about the economic prospects of "global Britain".

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'A lot to be very proud of' - Corbyn on Labour in Wales

Jeremy Corbyn and David Cornock
Image caption Jeremy Corbyn: 'Allowing Wales to set its own immigration rules would be "fraught with difficulties'

For a man who's had better New Years, Jeremy Corbyn seemed chipper enough.

He may be under fire from his own MPs on Brexit and immigration, and his shadow defence secretary may be "absolutely furious" about his views on Nato, but the Labour leader was relaxed when we met in his Commons office on Thursday morning.

Read full article 'A lot to be very proud of' - Corbyn on Labour in Wales

'Super-narrow squeak' over Welsh powers Bill

A clerk consults standing orders as peers await the result of the Wales Bill vote.
Image caption A clerk consults standing orders as peers await the result of the Wales Bill vote.

They don't do penalty shoot-outs in the House of Lords. Instead, they have standing order 56 to decide drawn matches.

Last night's tied vote on the Wales Bill - on a Labour amendment to devolve industrial relations in devolved public services - had clerks reaching for the rulebook.

Read full article 'Super-narrow squeak' over Welsh powers Bill

Cairns slays the dragon as peers scrutinise Wales Bill

Wales Office and UK Government logos Image copyright UK Government
Image caption Exit the dragon? The Wales Office has re-branded.

For many, it's been the pressing issue of 2016, its every twist and turn followed with increasing fascination by politicos up and down Wales.

It's been the dominant topic of conversation whenever political anoraks have gathered together, its implications for Wales's future pored over at length.

Read full article Cairns slays the dragon as peers scrutinise Wales Bill

Cairns grilled over Brexit, Wales Bill and his own job

Chris Davies MP
Image caption 'Special measures' - Conservative MP Chris Davies's plan for the Welsh Government

The annual appearance of the secretary of state for Wales before MPs on the Welsh affairs committee is often one that fails to disturb the nation's front pages.

Often, the minister is fed gentle questions by his own side while deflecting hyperbole from his or her own opponents.

Read full article Cairns grilled over Brexit, Wales Bill and his own job

Lloyd George: 'The first really modern prime minister'

Lord Morgan
Image caption 'The first really modern prime minister.....he changed our world' - Historian and Labour peer Lord Kenneth O. Morgan of Aberdyfi

What springs to mind when you think of David Lloyd George?

It's a question I've been asking historians and politicians on the 100th anniversary of his arrival as prime minister.

Read full article Lloyd George: 'The first really modern prime minister'

Let them eat steak: Brexit, planes and automobiles

Stephen Crabb MP
Image caption Former cabinet minister Stephen Crabb wants 'full single market-style benefits' for the Welsh aerospace and automotive industries after Brexit.

It was more like Brexit Questions than Welsh Questions, with 11 of the 14 questions tabled focused on Britain leaving the EU.

We know that Theresa May's government won't provide a running commentary on the Brexit process so what did we learn today?

Read full article Let them eat steak: Brexit, planes and automobiles

The Bourne Ultimatum: minister's warning on Wales Bill

The Wales Bill
Image caption The Wales Bill, currently being debated at an upper House near you.

Is the Wales Bill approaching what Sir Alex Ferguson would describe as squeaky bum time?

Peers completed the Bill's committee stage on Tuesday night and will resume their consideration at report stage on December 14.

Read full article The Bourne Ultimatum: minister's warning on Wales Bill

Hammond: Welsh angles, city deals and warm words

Philip Hammond Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption If only balancing the books were this easy....Chancellor Philip Hammond.

It is the most challenging two minutes of my year: explaining to a live TV audience what the Autumn Statement means for Wales - while the chancellor is still delivering it.

It is also a challenge to discover - and explain - what parts of the statement apply beyond England, which are devolved, and which have those Barnett consequentials.

Read full article Hammond: Welsh angles, city deals and warm words

Follow our example, Welsh Government tells chancellor

Ken Skates AM Image copyright Welsh Government
Image caption Looking to the future or virtual reality? Ken Skates at the announcement of the advanced manufacturing research institute.

"We have delivered," said the Welsh economy secretary. "We expect UK government to deliver as well."

If you're reading this after a lengthy, congested commute home, you may want to know that Ken Skates was talking about infrastructure in north-east Wales.

Read full article Follow our example, Welsh Government tells chancellor