London attack: What new anti-terror powers could be used?

  • 6 June 2017
  • From the section UK
Close-up of armed police's automatic weapon, near Borough Market Image copyright Getty Images

Recent attacks in London and Manchester have sparked calls for something to be done about the UK's counter-terrorism laws. But what could an incoming government practically achieve by creating new powers to pursue and lock up suspects?

What is Theresa May proposing ?

The PM said she would make it easier to deport foreign terror suspects and "restrict the freedom and movements" of those that present a threat.

"And I mean doing more to restrict the freedom and movements of terrorist suspects when we have enough evidence to know they are a threat, but not enough evidence to prosecute them in full in court," she said.

"And if our human rights laws get in the way of doing it, we will change the law so we can do it."

This looks very much like an attempt to return the current TPim restrictions - a form of house arrest - closer to what they used to be when they were called control orders. Those orders were created by Labour in 2004 and they included long curfews and restrictions on who people could meet and communicate with. They were abolished by the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition and replaced by less restrictive TPims in 2011.

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London attacker: Khuram Butt showed his extremist colours

  • 5 June 2017
  • From the section UK
Khuram Butt Image copyright UNKNOWN
Image caption Police have named one of the attackers as Khuram Butt (pictured)

Khuram Butt wore an Arsenal shirt during his murderous assault on other Londoners.

Some of those whom he wanted to kill may too have been wearing the club's colours.

Read full article London attacker: Khuram Butt showed his extremist colours

How has armed policing changed?

  • 5 June 2017
  • From the section UK
CT-SFO officers pictured during 2016 Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The new elite CT-SFO force was unveiled in London last year

The number of police on our streets - armed or not - is now at the heart of an election row between the Conservatives and Labour over how to prevent acts of terrorism.

With three attacks in 75 days, Labour has claimed that police cuts since 2010 have gone "too far" and the public cannot be protected on the cheap.

Read full article How has armed policing changed?

London attack: What we have learned

  • 4 June 2017
  • From the section UK
People with their hands on their heads in Borough Market Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Run, Hide: Police used prepared tactic to clear area

Three terror attacks on the UK in 75 days. Thirty-four people dead, many, many more injured. The five attackers all dead too.

By my calculations, this is the most sustained and bloody series of attacks outside of Northern Ireland since the IRA's 1974 winter bombing campaign - although there have been bigger individual attacks, such as the 7/7 London bombings in 2005.

Read full article London attack: What we have learned

Manchester attack: The bewildering complexity of a terror inquiry

Police during a search of an address in Manchester Image copyright AFP

The investigation into Manchester bomber Salman Abedi's connections has already branched out in multiple directions, and the whole nature of tracking people before they commit an act of terror is bewilderingly complex.

It could be over in hours - or it could take weeks.

Read full article Manchester attack: The bewildering complexity of a terror inquiry

Manchester attack: The Libya-jihad connection

Salman Abedi
Image caption Salman Abedi has been named by police as the Manchester bomber

As each hour passes we learn more about Salman Abedi. What we don't know yet is his exact journey from Manchester-born boy to suicide bomber.

The BBC has been told by a Muslim community worker that members of the public called the police anti-terrorism hotline about Abedi's extreme and violent views several years ago.

Read full article Manchester attack: The Libya-jihad connection

Manchester attack: The next steps for police and MI5

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Media captionIan Hopkins, from Greater Manchester Police, said it was the "most horrific incident" the city has faced

The UK has not seen a bomb attack like the Manchester outrage since 2005 for three simple reasons:

For more than a decade, the BBC Home Affairs Unit has monitored every single terrorist incident, attempted or failed, that has made it into the public domain.

Read full article Manchester attack: The next steps for police and MI5

London terror alert: How serious is it?

  • 28 April 2017
  • From the section UK
Police cordon in Willesden Image copyright Graham Eva/BBC

Two counter-terrorism operations in the space of a few hours. This is a fast-moving story - new facts are emerging all the time.

I'll keep this blog updated through the day with what we know, along with some analysis from the Home Affairs Unit, the BBC team that has covered terrorism for more than a decade.

Read full article London terror alert: How serious is it?

Why nobody seems to know if crime is up or down

  • 27 April 2017
  • From the section UK
A man in handcuffs Image copyright Getty Images

Back in 1993, a rapidly rising Tony Blair caught the public's attention by pledging to be "tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime".

Liverpool toddler Jamie Bulger had been murdered and violence would soon peak at around four million incidents a year. Records show the public were really worried about crime.

Read full article Why nobody seems to know if crime is up or down

London attack: Who was Khalid Masood?

  • 26 March 2017
  • From the section UK
Khalid Masood Image copyright Metropolitan Police

The man police say was responsible for the Westminster attack has been formally identified as 52-year-old Khalid Masood.

He had at least three children.

Read full article London attack: Who was Khalid Masood?