Paraplegic man convicted of Syria-related terror charge

  • 11 May 2016
  • From the section UK
Abdallah
Image caption Abdal Raouf Abdallah has been in a wheelchair since he was injured in Libya at the age of 18

A British-Libyan man, left paralysed since he took part in the 2011 Libyan uprising, has been convicted of trying to help an RAF veteran travel to Syria to fight with militants there.

Abdal Raouf Abdallah, 23, from Manchester, had denied two counts of preparing acts of terrorism.

Former serviceman Stephen Mustafa Gray, who tried and failed to reach Syria, admitted three offences last year.

The court heard Abdallah had tried to arrange firearms and cash for the trip.

A jury at Woolwich Crown Court convicted Abdallah by a majority of 10 to two of two counts of preparing acts of terrorism through the help he gave to Gray, Abdallah's own brother Mohammed and two other men.

Read full article Paraplegic man convicted of Syria-related terror charge

Police and Crime Commissioners: Unloved but re-elected

A voter voting at the 2016 elections Image copyright PA

We now have 40 newly-elected police and crime commissioners across England and Wales - but what does it mean and does anybody care?

Back in 2012, the former coalition government's controversial plan to put elected police and crime commissioners in charge of the nation's constabularies was sold with one simple idea: people power.

Read full article Police and Crime Commissioners: Unloved but re-elected

Undercover police denied automatic anonymity at inquiry

  • 3 May 2016
  • From the section UK
Media captionFormer girlfriend: ‘We talked about spending the rest of our lives together’

Undercover police officers facing claims of wrongdoing will not automatically get anonymity at a forthcoming major public inquiry.

Sir Christopher Pitchford, the inquiry's chairman, said he recognised the public interest in proceedings being "as open as possible".

Read full article Undercover police denied automatic anonymity at inquiry

Hillsborough and the long journey to change the police

  • 29 April 2016
  • From the section UK
A Hillsborough family campaigner holding up a justice scarf Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Hillsborough families after this week's inquest verdict

There is a very important legal maxim: justice delayed is justice denied. Never was that truer than in the battle for answers over Hillsborough.

A 27-year wait to hear a jury say that the police were wrong, that the fans were innocent and 96 blameless people had been unlawfully killed.

Read full article Hillsborough and the long journey to change the police

Eurozone crisis 'pushing migrants to UK'

  • 13 April 2016
  • From the section UK
The British and EU flags Image copyright Reuters

The eurozone jobs crisis is encouraging more southern European migrants to head to the UK to join those from the east, the Migration Observatory has said.

Over the past five years the number of EU nationals living in the UK has gone up by almost 700,000 to 3.3 million.

Read full article Eurozone crisis 'pushing migrants to UK'

Afghan boy smuggled in lorry texted: 'No oxygen'

  • 8 April 2016
  • From the section UK
Media captionAhmed had been in a refugee camp in Calais

A seven-year-old Afghan boy who was in a sealed lorry was rescued by UK police after texting he was suffocating.

The boy, using a phone given by a charity in Calais, said he was running out of "oksijan" - meaning oxygen.

Read full article Afghan boy smuggled in lorry texted: 'No oxygen'

Can you stop a paedophile before they've abused a child?

  • 7 April 2016
  • From the section World
A man receiving drugs to lower his sexual drive Image copyright Walacea
Image caption Could chemical castration be used to prevent child abuse?

Can you stop a paedophile before they've abused a child?

That's the aim of a unique clinical trial in Sweden that aims to intervene in the lives of potential abusers. And it's a trial that raises ethical and legal questions about whether societies can come up with therapies for the most dangerous offenders before they have broken the law.

Read full article Can you stop a paedophile before they've abused a child?

How Islamic State group supporters targeted the UK

  • 1 April 2016
  • From the section UK
Junead and Shazib Khan Image copyright CPS
Image caption Junead and his uncle, Shazib Khan were also found guilty of planning to go and fight in Syria

A delivery driver from Luton has been found guilty of plotting a terror attack on US military personnel in the UK as a show of his allegiance to the self-styled Islamic State group. What does his case say about the nature of the threat faced by the UK?

Three months. Three juries. And each has found beyond reasonable doubt evidence of attack planning in the UK linked to the self-styled Islamic State fighting group.

Read full article How Islamic State group supporters targeted the UK

Can an inquiry into secrets ever be public?

  • 22 March 2016
  • From the section UK
New Scotland Yard Image copyright PA
Image caption What's behind the mirrored windows?

Whatever you may read elsewhere, don't believe for a moment that police and spooks freely give away secrets. If they did, by definition, they wouldn't be secret.

That is the price an otherwise open society pays if it wants agencies involved in secret activity to protect the public.

Read full article Can an inquiry into secrets ever be public?

Channel migrants detained in freight shed

  • 8 March 2016
  • From the section UK
The freight shed used to hold migrants Image copyright HMIP
Image caption Detained: The temporary holding shed at Folkestone

Channel border officials were so "overwhelmed" by clandestine migrants last year they had to house some of them in a freight shed, inspectors say.

A report says officials could not cope with the thousands who arrived at Folkestone and Dover over the summer.

Read full article Channel migrants detained in freight shed