Dominic Casciani, Home affairs correspondent

Dominic Casciani Home affairs correspondent

Come here for reports and insight into home affairs as well as stories and content from around the web

Lord chief justice attacks secret trials

  • 12 November 2014
  • From the section UK
Lord Thomas,
Lord Thomas said that if there was a need for secrecy it should be explained

The lord chief justice of England and Wales has condemned an attempt to hold a completely secret trial, saying it should never happen again.

Lord Thomas said defendants should "never, ever" be anonymous in criminal trials because justice must be open.

His comments come after a judge discharged the jury in a secret terrorism trial at the Old Bailey.

The defendant, Erol Incedal, faces a retrial which is expected to feature the same levels of secrecy.

Mr Incedal was charged last year with two offences - preparing for acts of terrorism and possessing a document useful to a terrorist - both of which he had denied.

Read full article Lord chief justice attacks secret trials

Is the European Arrest Warrant worth it?

  • 10 November 2014
  • From the section UK
Handcuffs on suspect in UK - file pic

The home secretary says the European Arrest Warrant is about fighting crime across Europe - but her opponents say it's just another cave-in to a growing Brussels superstate, weakening our Parliament and courts.

There is a lot at stake in Monday's Commons vote on joining a raft of European Union joint measures on crime and justice - but the vote isn't actually about the EAW.

Read full article Is the European Arrest Warrant worth it?

Analysis: An inquiry doomed to fail?

  • 31 October 2014
  • From the section UK
Fiona Woolf
Resigned: Fiona Woolf says she is sad she could not command confidence

Who would be the chair of a formal inquiry?

The catastrophic double-failed launch of the historical abuse inquiry raises serious questions for the Home Secretary over how she and her officials have managed this process to date - but it also demonstrates how difficult it can be to find someone capable of doing one of the toughest jobs in public life.

Read full article Analysis: An inquiry doomed to fail?

Probation service private bidders named

  • 29 October 2014
  • From the section UK
Prison interior
Prisoners who have served less than 12 months have the highest reoffending rates

Ministers have named the private firms they expect to take on the probation service's role monitoring thousands of offenders in England and Wales.

The government's plan will see 21 trusts of companies and charities managing criminals from next year.

Read full article Probation service private bidders named

The undercover cop, his lover, and their son

  • 24 October 2014
  • From the section Magazine
Father and child
Bob "Robinson" Lambert with his and Jacqui's son

The Metropolitan Police has agreed to pay £425,000 to a woman who did not know the father of her child was an undercover policeman. The unprecedented settlement comes after a long battle by a group of women who say that the police used sex to infiltrate their protest groups. Here is Jacqui's story.

The 14 hours of labour that delivered Jacqui's first child was the most intimate moment of her life. In her words, she shared it with a ghost.

Read full article The undercover cop, his lover, and their son

Government 'deporting too few foreign criminals'

  • 22 October 2014
  • From the section UK
A prisoner in jail
Staying put: NAO finds little improvement in removals

Ministers have been criticised by the UK spending watchdog for failing to deport more foreign criminals.

The National Audit Office said the number of foreign prisoners had gone up despite a near tenfold increase in officials working on their cases.

Read full article Government 'deporting too few foreign criminals'

How the battle against IS is being fought online

  • 9 October 2014
  • From the section Magazine
woman holding #notinmyname placard

The battle against Islamic State (IS) militants has been fought in part on social networks, and has raised the question - how best to counter the message being spread by jihadists?

Last weekend, amid the murder of Alan Henning, there was a glimmer of hope.

Read full article How the battle against IS is being fought online

Analysis: Can extremism plan work?

For years, ministers and policymakers have argued over the response to extremism because they have never been quite clear how to define it.

Now, after many years of behind-the-scenes wrangling, a Conservative home secretary is nailing her colours to this particular mast.

Read full article Analysis: Can extremism plan work?

Rise in UK trafficking, slavery and exploitation

  • 30 September 2014
  • From the section UK
Image from Home Office anti-slavery TV ad
The Home Office ran TV adverts earlier this year to highlight modern slavery, including prostitution

The number of people trafficked for slavery or other exploitation in the UK has risen sharply to more than 2,700, the National Crime Agency (NCA) says.

The rise includes people lured to the country after meeting people via online dating or job recruitment sites.

Read full article Rise in UK trafficking, slavery and exploitation

Prisoner voting ruled out for another year

  • 26 September 2014
  • From the section UK
Man looking out of prison
The European court first ruled in favour of giving some British prisoners the vote in 2005

Eight years, 11 months and 21 days. That's how much time has passed since the European Court of Human Rights first told the UK that it had to change the law on prisoners voting. But so far no final bill has seen the light of day in Parliament.

Now, the saga will go on for yet another year - after a political compromise that, rather usefully to both sides, avoids the row blowing up as the British general election approaches.

Read full article Prisoner voting ruled out for another year

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About Dominic

Dominic began his career in local newspapers after studying languages at university.

Since joining the BBC in 1998 he has focused on stories relating to law, order, society and belonging - including immigration, ethnicity, the rule of law and terrorism.

He has spent most of his BBC career working online and was one of the pioneers of live online reporting for the BBC, filing stories from the field in the days when mobile phones looked like bricks and we had no idea when the data would reach the news editor.

He is married with two children. His unspellable surname is Italian.

When not undertaking family or work duties, you'll find him cycling up and down hills dreaming of Tour de France greatness.

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