Dominic Casciani, Home affairs correspondent

Dominic Casciani Home affairs correspondent

Come here for reports and insight into home affairs as well as stories and content from around the web

How the battle against IS is being fought online

  • 9 October 2014
  • From the section Magazine
woman holding #notinmyname placard

The battle against Islamic State (IS) militants has been fought in part on social networks, and has raised the question - how best to counter the message being spread by jihadists?

Last weekend, amid the murder of Alan Henning, there was a glimmer of hope.

Between Friday and Saturday night, for once, the online propaganda campaign from IS felt drowned out.

The hashtag #notinmyname swarmed around the net in the hours after reports of Mr Henning's death, driven by Western Muslims who are sickened, heart-broken and furious at how their faith has been hijacked.

Analysis by BBC News shows that over the course of Friday evening the hashtag reached an audience equivalent to those sitting down to watch the main news bulletins.

Read full article How the battle against IS is being fought online

Analysis: Can extremism plan work?

For years, ministers and policymakers have argued over the response to extremism because they have never been quite clear how to define it.

Now, after many years of behind-the-scenes wrangling, a Conservative home secretary is nailing her colours to this particular mast.

Read full article Analysis: Can extremism plan work?

Rise in UK trafficking, slavery and exploitation

  • 30 September 2014
  • From the section UK
Image from Home Office anti-slavery TV ad
The Home Office ran TV adverts earlier this year to highlight modern slavery, including prostitution

The number of people trafficked for slavery or other exploitation in the UK has risen sharply to more than 2,700, the National Crime Agency (NCA) says.

The rise includes people lured to the country after meeting people via online dating or job recruitment sites.

Read full article Rise in UK trafficking, slavery and exploitation

Prisoner voting ruled out for another year

  • 26 September 2014
  • From the section UK
Man looking out of prison
The European court first ruled in favour of giving some British prisoners the vote in 2005

Eight years, 11 months and 21 days. That's how much time has passed since the European Court of Human Rights first told the UK that it had to change the law on prisoners voting. But so far no final bill has seen the light of day in Parliament.

Now, the saga will go on for yet another year - after a political compromise that, rather usefully to both sides, avoids the row blowing up as the British general election approaches.

Read full article Prisoner voting ruled out for another year

Why new anti-terror powers aim to disrupt not prosecute

  • 1 September 2014
  • From the section UK
An image grab taken from a propaganda video uploaded by Islamic State allegedly showing militants driving at an undisclosed location in Iraq's Nineveh province
Hundreds of British nationals are thought to have travelled to Syria and Iraq to fight with militant groups

The government has announced a raft of new counter-terrorism powers to combat what security officials regard as a severe threat from so-called Islamic State fighters returning from Syria and Iraq.

These powers are not necessarily aimed at prosecuting more people - they are aimed squarely at disrupting them.

Read full article Why new anti-terror powers aim to disrupt not prosecute

Immigration figures show UK is increasingly European

  • 28 August 2014
  • From the section UK
Gatwick airport arrivals
Hallo, Ciao, Bonjour, Czesc! More and more EU workers

The latest release of migration statistics are part of the story of an open market economy in a globalised world.

But they also reveal the indirect effect of the UK's historic shift in focus from its own former empire to the continent on its doorstep.

Read full article Immigration figures show UK is increasingly European

Analysis: The Prevent strategy and its problems

  • 26 August 2014
  • From the section UK
Three young men in an extremist recruitment video
Young Britons have appeared with other extremists in a recruitment video for jihadists in Iraq and Syria

Preventing Violent Extremism - also known as Prevent - has been a government priority for a decade.

But despite millions of pounds, initiative after initiative, the strategy remains deeply controversial, virtually impossible to fully assess and, if its critics are right, fatally compromised and incapable of achieving its goals.

Read full article Analysis: The Prevent strategy and its problems

Analysis: Deradicalising Brits in Syria

  • 21 August 2014
  • From the section UK
A British fighter in Syria:
A British fighter in Syria - identified by security researchers ISCR

The British fighter stands by some graffiti on a foreign battle-field.

"This Khilafah will have NO Borders... ONLY FRONTS."

Read full article Analysis: Deradicalising Brits in Syria

Domestic abuse crime considered by ministers

  • 20 August 2014
  • From the section UK
Abused woman
A new offence could end ambiguity over the criminal definition of abuse, ministers say

A new crime of domestic abuse could be created under plans being considered by ministers.

Home Secretary Theresa May is consulting on creating the offence in England and Wales as part of attempts to improve police performance.

Read full article Domestic abuse crime considered by ministers

Home Office ordered to pay £224m to e-Borders firm

  • 18 August 2014
  • From the section UK

The Home Office has been told to pay £224m to a major US corporation it sacked for failing to deliver a controversial secure borders programme.

Ministers will pay Raytheon £50m in damages, plus other costs.

Read full article Home Office ordered to pay £224m to e-Borders firm

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About Dominic

Dominic began his career in local newspapers after studying languages at university.

Since joining the BBC in 1998 he has focused on stories relating to law, order, society and belonging - including immigration, ethnicity, the rule of law and terrorism.

He has spent most of his BBC career working online and was one of the pioneers of live online reporting for the BBC, filing stories from the field in the days when mobile phones looked like bricks and we had no idea when the data would reach the news editor.

He is married with two children. His unspellable surname is Italian.

When not undertaking family or work duties, you'll find him cycling up and down hills dreaming of Tour de France greatness.

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