Why Roy Moore can still win in Alabama

Roy Moore Image copyright Getty Images

One week ago we were reporting from Alabama. An extraordinary Senate race is being played out in this Deep South state - between a Democrat, Doug Jones, and the Republican candidate Roy Moore.

Roy Moore has been called many things in his political life: a racist, a homophobe, a man who has said American Muslims shouldn't stand for office and that gay sex should be made illegal. He is considered to occupy a place far to the right of any other elected senator.

But all that paled briefly into the background this week after allegations emerged in the Washington Post - a number of women came forward to claim he had made unwanted sexual advances - including, one said, when she was just 14 years old.

A second woman claiming she'd been assaulted by him aged 16 has now come forward as I write this.

Roy Moore is not new to public office. He's twice been elected Alabama Supreme Court justice. He's twice been fired from that post - once for refusing to remove a monument of the Ten Commandments from the Alabama Judicial Building.

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Election results 2017: Did we miss the noise?

Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn delivers a speech to a large crowds at a rally in Gateshead Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption There were big crowds at many of Jeremy Corbyn's events

One thing I learnt from the US presidential campaign was that sometimes you have to ignore the numbers and the rational response and just listen to the noise.

We saw it all over America - wherever Trump was, there were crowds, there were queues, there was enthusiasm and there was noise. We saw it for Bernie too. But we didn't much see it for the other candidates.

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Election results 2017: The bubbles we missed

Emily Maitlis at the BBC election results screen
Image caption Emily Maitlis reported on the results as they came in on the BBC election screen

Glancing up at the big screen in studio D at Elstree, I see the rather glum face of Mark Field, MP for Cities of London and Westminster.

It reminds me suddenly of a conversation we had a month or so ago.

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Pollsters, Pilates and the politics of labels

  • 17 November 2016
  • From the section UK
Emily Maitlis

This morning, a throwaway phrase stopped me in the middle of a stomach crunch.

It was during a (liberal, elite) Pilates class - when our (gay, Australian ) teacher addressed the (white, female) participants with the words "Right now girls...".

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Donald Trump, the Snapchat president?

  • 15 November 2016
  • From the section UK
Donald Trump holds up a Donald Trump mask Image copyright Getty Images

The imminent Trump presidency throws up a hundred column ideas a day. So I feel I'm not done here yet. But one of the questions I keep returning to is this: Will he do what he said he would do? And is that a good thing or a bad thing?

It is, it's fair to say, an unusual predicament to be in as a journalist. Normally, holding our elected officials to account means ensuring they stick to their pledges.

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US election 2016: What time should I go to bed?

A woman with a US flag sticker on her face Image copyright Getty Images

The good news about a US election night - or the disappointing news if you're hardcore - is that they are normally pretty fast.

If there is a decisive victory we should know the result by around 04:00 GMT (23:00 EST). Obama's first election in 2008 was done and dusted by 04:30 GMT (23:30 EST).

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Paul Auster on US election: 'I am scared out of my wits'

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Media captionPaul Auster on US election: 'I am scared out of my wits'

On a gentrified street in Brooklyn, in a neighbourhood where steps are still strewn with Halloween pumpkins, we knock on the door of the novelist Paul Auster, one of New York's most cherished writers.

He opens the door himself, and invites us in - an hour early in our enthusiasm. We begin to rearrange his immaculately placed sitting room furniture into something that resembles an interview setting.

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US election 2016: Who says you can only vote once?

Donald Trump Image copyright Getty Images

The first time I heard Donald Trump in Colorado call on voters who had already voted to go back and vote again, I nearly fell off my chair.

And to be fair, he was telling them in a state where anyone who tried to do so would probably be arrested, or at least stared down. He told his crowd of supporters to do that because - he said - the votes would not be properly counted. His line throughout this campaign has been that the system is skewed against him and that he would be cheated out of a win.

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US election 2016: A nerd's guide to the polls

Voters casts their ballots in the primaries in Illinois, Chicago Image copyright Getty Images

"Warning!" boomed the voice in my aeroplane headphones. "This election contains adult content. Passengers should be advised."

"That's sensible," I thought. "Yes, they really should send out a warning. It's been shocking."

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The FBI man who 'doesn’t give a hoot about politics'

James Comey Image copyright Getty Images

The poor dog seems to end up with the FBI costume every Halloween. But this year it somehow seems a bit more apposite - although try getting a hound interested in an email scent and you'll be there a long time.

In the US, Democrats are queuing up to condemn the politicisation of one James Comey, the FBI Director who once declared he didn't "give a hoot about politics". But he has now become embroiled in the most stinking political row - and what's curious is that Republicans are starting to question his actions now too.

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