Has David Cameron opened Pandora's Box?

So, what did he mean by that?

David Cameron's admission that he will not serve a third term in Downing Street will provoke a flurry of speculation. What was he hoping to achieve? What message was he trying to send?

First things first. I asked him a question and he answered it. It was not something that a helpful Downing Street official had suggested I might ask with a heavy hint that I might get an interesting answer. It was just one of many speculative questions that political journalists like me ask in the hope that just occasionally they might get an answer. And this time it did.

Second, Mr Cameron's overt aim was to get across the message that he would serve a full second term. He wants to quash speculation that he might stand down early in 2017 after a referendum on the UK's EU membership.

But by emphasising that he would do another five years, he inevitably has to address what he would do after that. And his answer was clear. Terms in Downing Street, he said, are like Shredded Wheat: "two are wonderful, three might just be too many."

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Leader profile: Nick Clegg opens up about life outside politics

Nick Clegg is unique in British politics.

No MP has such a cosmopolitan and international background - his mother is Dutch, his father half Russian, his wife Spanish.

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Budget 2015: Osborne's message to voters

Chancellor George Osborne with his Treasury team outside 11 Downing Street

George Osborne's aim today was to turn the economic recovery of the country into the political recovery of the Conservatives.

So, he tried to reassure voters worried about another Tory-led government and convince them they'll benefit from the growing economy.

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Budget 2015: Police warning over leak risk

Chancellor George Osborne outside 11 Downing Street prior to the 2014 Budget
Mr Osborne is set to deliver his sixth Budget

The top civil servant at the Treasury has warned staff he will not "hesitate to call in the police" if anyone leaks details from the Budget.

Sir Nicholas Macpherson has sent an email to officials reminding them he takes rules banning any pre-briefing of next week's Budget "very seriously".

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UKIP tries to broaden its appeal

The UKIP leader Nigel Farage

There was a time when UKIP appeared bomb proof.

Candidates and party members would say offensive things. A media storm would hurtle through. And the party could steadily continue to win votes.

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A chat with Justine Miliband

At home, Justine Miliband is a mother of two young boys. At work, she is an eloquent barrister. And in public, she is a silently supportive wife.

But not for much longer. In her first major broadcast interview, the wife of the Labour leader has come out fighting in defence of her husband.

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Leader profile: 24 hours with Nigel Farage

Nigel Farage has a secret, a nocturnal passion.

Away from the pubs and the cameras, while the nation is sleeping, the leader of UKIP likes to go fishing. On the Kent coast. At night. By himself.

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Could UK politics go a little bit Swedish?

Swedish parliament
The Social Democrat-led minority government has 138 of the 349 seats in the Swedish Riksdag

Imagine for a moment that a Conservative-led coalition is defeated at the general election.

It is replaced by what could loosely be called a centre-left coalition that includes the Green Party. But this new government does not have a majority in parliament. It represents only the largest minority group and survives day to day by scraping together temporary coalitions - deal by deal, issue by issue.

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Hague opts for the lesser of two EVELs

William Hague

William Hague has chosen the lesser of two EVELs.

His version of this ghastly acronym would give English MPs control over the detail - and a veto over - English laws. But MPs from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland would still have a role debating and voting on English legislation.

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Tory MPs at odds over English votes for English laws

Cross of St George and Union Jack flags outside a London pub
Many Conservative backbenchers want a separate English Parliament

WARNING: this blog contains constitutional stuff that can be complicated but does matter.

Along the corridors of Westminster a faint murmur of grumbling can be heard, a sound that for now is sotto voce but could soon explode into the open.

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