Theresa May reprimands Johnson

Theresa May arrives in Canada Image copyright PA

"This government is driven from the front."

It wasn't the most vicious reprimand. Boris Johnson and many of his contemporaries will have heard and perhaps felt far worse at Eton College.

But the meaning was clear enough. "I'm in charge," Theresa May was saying, "and not Boris".

Bout of speculation

The prime minister's assertion in plain language that ways to spend money saved by the Treasury from Brexit would be taken by the government, by ministers collectively (and not simply by Boris writing a 4,000 word essay for a newspaper with little or no prior consultation with Number 10) sounded like a second sharp little slap.

The foreign secretary's intervention has set off a new bout of speculation about power play and tension in government, even paper talk that Mr Johnson might contemplate a sudden and hugely disruptive resignation.

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General election 2017: May, Corbyn and their tiny charmed circles

Theresa May's centre stage tonight - again - so's Jeremy Corbyn - again.

They're both facing questions and a live audience on the BBC's Question Time, leaders special programme.

Read full article General election 2017: May, Corbyn and their tiny charmed circles

Tory discomfort over Boris Johnson's Syria statement

Boris Johnson

It's really rather easy to see why Boris Johnson believes a hypothetical US request for British help in bombing Syria might be hard to turn down.

It's far less easy to see why a British foreign secretary might choose the early stages of a general election campaign to speculate on the matter aloud.

Read full article Tory discomfort over Boris Johnson's Syria statement

Theresa May's authority grows with by-election win

Theresa May addresses press in Copeland on 24 February 2014

Like yesterday's storms, the campaign circus - the big name politicians - have moved on.

The by-elections in Copeland and Stoke-on-Trent Central have left politics a little clearer than before.

Read full article Theresa May's authority grows with by-election win

Corbyn guessing game rises to new pitch

Jeremy Corbyn Image copyright PA

Could Jeremy Corbyn be replaced as Labour leader? And if so when?

Those whispered questions have been echoing between Labour MPs and party apparatchiks at Westminster for weeks, for months. But today the guessing game has risen to a new pitch.

Read full article Corbyn guessing game rises to new pitch

Does by-election pain await Labour in its heartlands?

Jeremy Corbyn Image copyright PA

Two parliamentary by-elections, two weeks away.

Is Labour a sitting duck in its own heartland territory?

Read full article Does by-election pain await Labour in its heartlands?

Labour happier now over immigration?

Jeremy Corbyn Image copyright PA

"Jeremy Corbyn hasn't changed his mind about anything in 40 years," goes the mocking refrain.

It sounds scornful, and it's meant to. It's also unfair. Just a little, anyway.

Read full article Labour happier now over immigration?

Sir Ivan's resignation sign of greater Whitehall strain

Sir Ivan Rogers Image copyright EPA
Image caption Sir Ivan Rogers' successor faces a difficult task

For one minister - an enthusiast for Brexit - it was very simple: "You're either on board, or you're not. He wasn't. We move on." The minister sounded rather cheerful.

So, Sir Ivan Rogers had gone because his face didn't fit. Now the way was clear for a true believer in the opportunities opened up by the vote to leave the EU.

Read full article Sir Ivan's resignation sign of greater Whitehall strain

Post-Brexit migration in 'national interest'

David Davis addressing MPs Image copyright AFP

David Davis has moved to reassure British firms and universities their interests will not be needlessly harmed by migration controls after the UK leaves the European Union.

Facing questions for the first time from the cross-party Brexit select committee, Mr Davis emphasised it was his job to return control of immigration policy to British ministers.

Read full article Post-Brexit migration in 'national interest'

Visa tensions on May's India trip

Narendra Modi and Theresa May Image copyright PA

If Theresa May was seeking to ramp up UK-India trade in smiles, salutes and friendly rhetoric, she'd have a world class deal already.

The prime minister shared a long lunch, a long chat and two public platforms with her Indian counterpart, Narendra Modi, in New Delhi and she's sure to spend more time in future cultivating a personal and economic relationship she sees as vital to British prosperity after Brexit.

Read full article Visa tensions on May's India trip