Will pensions be hit by Brexit?

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House prices lower, unemployment higher, real incomes down, a year long recession and now, poorer pensioners.

It might seem but a short wait for the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, given the amount of gloomy economic analysis that has been published on what may happen should Britain vote to leave the European Union.

All the different effects are actually derived from one significant starting point - that the economy would be smaller if the UK left the EU relative to where it would be if "remain" won on June 23.

On this issue, with varying degrees of pessimism, there is widespread - though not total - agreement among economic institutions from the International Monetary Fund to the Bank of England.

Whether that effect is short-term or long-term is more widely disputed.

A snapshot

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Brexit forecasts can be wrong, it doesn't mean they are pointless

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When I asked Christine Lagarde about the fact that the International Monetary Fund had been wrong in the past about its forecasts for the British economy, she gave a disarming response.

"Yes, on occasion we have been wrong," the managing director said earlier this month.

Read full article Brexit forecasts can be wrong, it doesn't mean they are pointless

Brexit 'could lead to 18% house price slump'

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A Treasury analysis of the "short term" economic impact of leaving the EU will claim that house prices could be 18% lower than under a remain scenario.

The BBC can reveal the report, to be released next week, will argue that Brexit would create a series of economic shocks which would have an impact on housing, employment and wages.

Read full article Brexit 'could lead to 18% house price slump'

Fujitsu chairman adds voice to pro-EU push

Masami Yamamoto
Image caption Masami Yamamoto said the UK is the centre of the European Union

The chairman of Fujitsu has warned that if Britain leaves the European Union (EU) it would reconsider its investments in the UK.

Masami Yamamoto told the BBC that Britain was at the heart of the "European region" and that his company, the largest Japanese employer in the UK, wanted it to remain so.

Read full article Fujitsu chairman adds voice to pro-EU push

Carney lights blue touch-paper on 'material' referendum risk

Mark Carney

Giving evidence to the House of Lords economics committee last month, the governor of the Bank of England explained his approach to assessing the possible economic impact of the European Union referendum.

"Assessing and reporting risks does not mean becoming involved in politics," Mark Carney told peers.

Read full article Carney lights blue touch-paper on 'material' referendum risk

'Absolutely wrong' – Cayman Islands' response to its critics

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The head of the Cayman Islands' main finance organisation has said that critics of the offshore centre are "absolutely wrong".

Jude Scott, the head of Cayman Finance which is part funded by the islands' government, said that publication of the ultimate beneficial owners of businesses in offshore centres would not be effective.

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Why business opinion matters in the EU referendum

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Image caption Both sides in June's EU referendum have been keen to roll out business leaders to support their cause

In his memoirs, Tony Blair wrote that one of the reasons business support for New Labour in the 1990s was important was for the message it sent voters - if businesses agree with us, then that is a powerful, non-political endorsement of our offer to you.

And even in an era before the collapse of trust in politicians, the word "non-political" carried a lot of weight.

Read full article Why business opinion matters in the EU referendum

Why is the UK economy in a funk?

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Image caption Growth in the UK's dominant service sector has slowed

Over the past 48 hours, three sets of economic data have been published which suggest the UK economy is heading for choppy waters.

In fact, some believe it may already be there.

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The economy and Brexit – a tangled tale

  • 28 April 2016
  • From the section Business
Vote Leave sign Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Leaving the EU would mean the UK saw faster growth, lower prices and a larger economy, Economists for Brexit argue

Today eight economists have struck out against much mainstream economic thinking and suggested that the UK economy would flourish outside the European Union.

The Economists for Brexit argue that if the Vote Leave campaign is successful on 23 June, the UK can look forward to faster growth, lower prices and a larger economy.

Read full article The economy and Brexit – a tangled tale

For Osborne, bad economic news could be good news

  • 26 April 2016
  • From the section Business
Muhammad Ali (L) (born Cassius Clay) and George Foreman in Kinshasa Image copyright Getty Images

When Muhammad Ali beat George Foreman in 1974's Rumble in the Jungle it wasn't until the eighth round knock-out that everyone suddenly realised what Ali was up to.

His "rope-a-dope" strategy of letting the more powerful Foreman punch himself to a standstill resulted in Ali winning a fight many had predicted, and the first seven rounds had suggested, he would lose.

Read full article For Osborne, bad economic news could be good news