Brexit: A messy divorce between two Britains

Remain supporters react to EU referendum results Image copyright AFP
Image caption Many supporters of the Stronger In campaign were horrified by the outcome

Londoner 1 to me this morning: "It feels like we've gone to war and the whole world has gone mad."

Londoner 2 to me this morning: "There are too many stupid people here, that's why we had to have Brexit."

The British capital is in shock today. Even people who voted Leave seem rather stunned by what's happened.

It is also a country deeply, bitterly divided and it is hard, so soon after this seismic result, to see how it can easily be unified.

Half the population is giddy, half despairing. This is not just a divorce between Britain and the EU, it feels just as much like a divorce between one Britain and another.

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Leave campaigners say the UK will be better off unshackled from the troubled EU economies

Read full article Brexit: A messy divorce between two Britains

Five reasons Brexit could signal Trump winning the White House

Donald Trump Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Mr Trump could be boosted by the UK leaving the EU

The two most surprising political phenomena of this year have been the rise of Donald Trump and the success of the Leave Europe camp in Britain's referendum on Brexit.

Few pundits saw either coming (and full disclosure, I include myself here, particularly on Trump) - but we should have and now would be a good chance to make up for past oversight by looking at how the two are linked.

Read full article Five reasons Brexit could signal Trump winning the White House

Why aren't we more excited about Clinton?

Hillary Clinton at Compton, California on 6 June Image copyright Reuters
Image caption The story of Hillary Clinton's candidacy has been going on for more than nine years

It has taken a long 227 years to get even this far.

George Washington was elected president of a newly independent America in 1789. Forty-two men later (41 of them white), Hillary Clinton is set to make history by being the first female nominee of a major party for the White House.

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The voters who hold key to a Trump win

Media captionCan Trump widen his appeal in places like Massachusetts?

If Donald Trump wants to win the White House in November he will have to find support in communities he hasn't done very well with so far.

He basically has four options. Win more Hispanics, more African Americans, more women or more working class voters who might previously have voted Democrat.

Read full article The voters who hold key to a Trump win

Brexit would hurt Britain, US foreign policy expert says

Media captionBrexit would make UK 'less important'

How would the relationship between the White House and the UK change if Britain were no longer part of the EU?

Tom Donilon - who spent three years as the most senior voice on foreign policy in the Obama administration - was clear. On issues where America dealt directly with the EU, issues like the nuclear deal with Iran, immigration and aid spending, not being present at the EU table would lessen Britain's importance for the US.

Read full article Brexit would hurt Britain, US foreign policy expert says

US election: How Trump defied all predictions

Trump in New York in September 2015 Image copyright AP
Image caption Trump's campaign launch was met with mockery... not any more

America tonight stands on the doorstep of greatness, or the precipice of doom.

Under a candidate this divisive, there's not much room for feeling anything in between, as the realisation dawns that Donald Trump now has a plausible shot at being America's next president.

Read full article US election: How Trump defied all predictions

Why Americans should care about Brexit

Media captionWhy the US should care about a Brexit

The president's former chief economic adviser defended Mr Obama's decision to weigh in on Brexit so forcefully.

It's a bit like when your sister goes out with a bad date, Austan Goolsbee told me, you just have to say something.

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Trump's a disaster with women voters - and not just on abortion

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump points as he speaks at a campaign stop, Wednesday, March 30, 2016, in Appleton, Wis Image copyright AP

Donald Trump said women who have abortions should be punished, he made crude insinuations about a TV anchor's menstrual cycle and he doesn't change nappies or do bedtimes.

No wonder he's struggling in the polls with women voters - it would be remarkable if he wasn't.

Read full article Trump's a disaster with women voters - and not just on abortion

US Election 2016: The Trump Protectionist Party

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the media at a press conference following victory in the Florida state primary on March 15, 2016 in West Palm Beach, Florida Image copyright Getty Images

It may be useful to stop thinking of this presidential campaign as a contest between Democrats and Republicans.

Hillary Clinton is a Democrat. Donald Trump is also a Democrat.

Read full article US Election 2016: The Trump Protectionist Party

US election 2016: Jorge Ramos on Donald Trump's rise

Media captionUnivision journalist Jorge Ramos on Donald Trump

Journalist Jorge Ramos does nothing small. At 57, he has presented TV news for 30 years. About 1.9 million viewers a night watch his Univision programme. He has interviewed 60 heads of state from almost every country in South and North America.

For Hispanics living in the US, Mr Ramos is about as close to a journalistic god as it gets. Or in the language of Donald Trump, Mr Ramos is, despite his slightly diminutive stature, "yooge".

Read full article US election 2016: Jorge Ramos on Donald Trump's rise