Why Americans should care about Brexit

Media captionWhy the US should care about a Brexit

The president's former chief economic adviser defended Mr Obama's decision to weigh in on Brexit so forcefully.

It's a bit like when your sister goes out with a bad date, Austan Goolsbee told me, you just have to say something.

Truth is though, most Americans are not very focused on the June 23rd vote on whether Britain should stay in or leave the EU.

They should be, Mr Goolsbee argued because there are knock on economic consequences.

Anything that adds uncertainty to the global financial system poses a risk and Brexit, he says, does that because we don't know what the impact will be on British and European banks' ability to operate across continental borders.

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Trump's a disaster with women voters - and not just on abortion

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump points as he speaks at a campaign stop, Wednesday, March 30, 2016, in Appleton, Wis Image copyright AP

Donald Trump said women who have abortions should be punished, he made crude insinuations about a TV anchor's menstrual cycle and he doesn't change nappies or do bedtimes.

No wonder he's struggling in the polls with women voters - it would be remarkable if he wasn't.

Read full article Trump's a disaster with women voters - and not just on abortion

US Election 2016: The Trump Protectionist Party

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the media at a press conference following victory in the Florida state primary on March 15, 2016 in West Palm Beach, Florida Image copyright Getty Images

It may be useful to stop thinking of this presidential campaign as a contest between Democrats and Republicans.

Hillary Clinton is a Democrat. Donald Trump is also a Democrat.

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US election 2016: Jorge Ramos on Donald Trump's rise

Media captionUnivision journalist Jorge Ramos on Donald Trump

Journalist Jorge Ramos does nothing small. At 57, he has presented TV news for 30 years. About 1.9 million viewers a night watch his Univision programme. He has interviewed 60 heads of state from almost every country in South and North America.

For Hispanics living in the US, Mr Ramos is about as close to a journalistic god as it gets. Or in the language of Donald Trump, Mr Ramos is, despite his slightly diminutive stature, "yooge".

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Europe hates Trump. Does it matter?

  • 4 March 2016
  • From the section Magazine
A carnival float mocking US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump stands on display near city hall on February 8, 2016 in Duesseldorf, Germany Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption A carnival float mocking US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was displayed in Duesseldorf last month

Invoking global opinion in the context of US elections is a fool's errand. Perfectly understandably, voters in Paris, Pennsylvania, really don't give a damn what voters in Paris, France, think about their political choices. And why should they?

This is America's choice, not anyone else's. How would British voters feel if Texans weighed in on Brexit? This time, however, the international reaction to Donald Trump is so forceful and so unanimous in its condemnation that it is worth drawing attention to. I do so well aware that recent history is replete with examples where the world's opinion of a US presidential candidate backfired against those same critics.

Read full article Europe hates Trump. Does it matter?

US election 2016: Lifelong Republicans turned off by Trump

Media caption"End of the party": Lifelong Republicans turned off by Trump

One of the many extraordinary things about this election is not how many people love Donald Trump, it's how many don't. And I don't just mean Democrats, or even Republican party grandees.

When asked about Mr Trump, a good number of ordinary, lifelong Republican voters express feelings that can only be described as loathing.

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Three things to watch for in New Hampshire

Media captionThree things to look for in New Hampshire results

Will New Hampshire be a boon or an another problem for suddenly less invincible Donald Trump? Will voters lean towards Marco Rubio? Can Bernie Sanders deliver an impressive win over Hillary Clinton in his neighbouring state?

The New Hampshire primaries will be crucial for both sides of the presidential race. The BBC's Katty Kay talks about the three things she'll be watching for on Tuesday night.

Read full article Three things to watch for in New Hampshire

US election: Confessions of a four-time caucus correspondent

Republican Presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) is seen on a television screen as reporters watch the Republican Presidential debate sponsored by Fox News and Google at the Iowa Events Center on 28 January 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa Image copyright Getty Images

I went to my first Iowa caucus in 2004, which I realise makes me a novice by the standards of veterans of the American press corps, who can can wax informatively about the Dukakis campaign of 1988 or even Reagan's triumph in 1980.

But even those four cycles have given me some insight into what makes the Byzantine caucus process so compelling. In some ways Iowa is unique in the US presidential election process but it also represents a snapshot of the broader American mood.

Read full article US election: Confessions of a four-time caucus correspondent

Two former senators want to undo US political 'crisis point'

Media captionTrent Lott and Tom Daschle tell the BBC's Katty Kay "we all have a burden to bear" in making the government work

Trent Lott and Tom Daschle make an unlikely pair. Trent is gregarious, talkative and loud. Tom is retiring, mild-mannered and quiet. Interview them together and their differences are pronounced.

But what makes them almost unheard of as a couple is that Lott is a Republican and Daschle is a Democrat. Specifically they are both former leaders of their respective parties in the US Senate.

Read full article Two former senators want to undo US political 'crisis point'

Obama's 'Jedi mind trick' and a revealing admission

Media captionPresident Obama sells his optimistic vision of the state of the US

It was unlike any State of the Union address that President Obama has delivered before. Instead of a laundry list of legislative goals, this speech was about defending his achievements and articulating what he wants his legacy to be.

That, of course, was a highly political task and there were plenty of thinly veiled attacks on his Republican opponents and Donald Trump in particular - although he was never mentioned by name.

Read full article Obama's 'Jedi mind trick' and a revealing admission