Election 2016: The race for battleground states

Media captionWhy some states matter more than others

Teams for both Clinton and Trump are campaigning in Pennsylvania this week, and both campaigns' planes were parked on the same runway in Ohio recently. In a country of 50 states, why do some seem to get more attention come election time?

Katty Kay explains why the race to win battleground states is key to winning the 2016 election.

Edited by Franz Strasser. Produced by Mat Morrison.

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US election: How Clinton could end her email scandal

Media captionHillary Clinton told NBC's Matt Lauer "it was a mistake to have a personal account"

Hillary Clinton declared her candidacy for the White House on 12 April 2015. That means she has had 514 days to figure out a good response to the email controversy.

As she demonstrated at the candidates' debate last night, so far she's failed.

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US election: Are the Democrats too confident?

Media captionParty divisions as ‘rabble’ find voice

My overriding impression from four days of the convention in Philadelphia is just how confident the Democrats are about this election.

Both on and off the record, sensible, reliable party stalwarts seem remarkably sure that Hillary Clinton will win in November, and possibly win big.

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A political convention like no other

New York delegate David DiPietro reacts during the third day session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Wednesday, July 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) Image copyright AP
Image caption A party divisions have been on display for a national audience

This is my seventh US political convention and I have never seen anything quite like this.

I've never heard a speaker booed on the stage or a party this beset by internal strife or a wing of a party drag the rest out to the fringes of political respectability. It's stunning and begs the question: Are we watching the death throes of the Republican Party?

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The women who run the world

Theresa May entering No 10 Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Mrs May is expected to negotiate the UK's exit from the EU

If Hillary Clinton wins the American presidential election in November, there will be women in charge of five of the leading countries and organisations in the world - the US, the UK, Germany, the IMF and the US Federal Reserve.

That's three of the world's biggest economies and two of the most important financial institutions. There's also the reasonable possibility of a woman becoming the new UN Secretary General.

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Who women want (in the White House)

Media captionWho Women Want (in the White House): Part One

Gender is set to be a defining issue in this year's US presidential race. Donald Trump recently claimed "the only thing" Hillary Clinton has "got going is the women's card, and the beautiful thing is, women don't like her".

Polls suggest the opposite - Hillary Clinton enjoys a lead among female voters of all backgrounds, while she struggles with the blue-collar male vote.

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Brexit: A messy divorce between two Britains

Remain supporters react to EU referendum results Image copyright AFP
Image caption Many supporters of the Stronger In campaign were horrified by the outcome

Londoner 1 to me this morning: "It feels like we've gone to war and the whole world has gone mad."

Londoner 2 to me this morning: "There are too many stupid people here, that's why we had to have Brexit."

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Five reasons Brexit could signal Trump winning the White House

Donald Trump Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Mr Trump could be boosted by the UK leaving the EU

The two most surprising political phenomena of this year have been the rise of Donald Trump and the success of the Leave Europe camp in Britain's referendum on Brexit.

Few pundits saw either coming (and full disclosure, I include myself here, particularly on Trump) - but we should have and now would be a good chance to make up for past oversight by looking at how the two are linked.

Read full article Five reasons Brexit could signal Trump winning the White House

Why aren't we more excited about Clinton?

Hillary Clinton at Compton, California on 6 June Image copyright Reuters
Image caption The story of Hillary Clinton's candidacy has been going on for more than nine years

It has taken a long 227 years to get even this far.

George Washington was elected president of a newly independent America in 1789. Forty-two men later (41 of them white), Hillary Clinton is set to make history by being the first female nominee of a major party for the White House.

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The voters who hold key to a Trump win

Media captionCan Trump widen his appeal in places like Massachusetts?

If Donald Trump wants to win the White House in November he will have to find support in communities he hasn't done very well with so far.

He basically has four options. Win more Hispanics, more African Americans, more women or more working class voters who might previously have voted Democrat.

Read full article The voters who hold key to a Trump win