The future of business news

Linda Yueh

This is my last blog here, as I've decided to leave my post as the BBC's Chief Business Correspondent based in Singapore and move back to the UK.

My move has set me thinking about the future of business news. There are two words that sum that up: global and digital.

First let us consider global. Businesses are increasingly organised so that their supply chains and markets extend across national borders. This means that events which happen in one part of the world can have important effects on businesses everywhere.

So, it is vital for business journalists to steer away from closed-economy thinking. Understanding and explaining the connections between consumers, producers, and policymakers in different countries is now essential to covering the beat.

Second, we are in the midst of a digital revolution when it comes to the way news is reported and delivered to audiences. I am not predicting that the end of TV and radio listings is right around the corner, but viewers increasingly want to watch and listen at a time when they want to.

Read full article The future of business news

Voters and businesses weigh in on Britain's post-election challenges

Shoppers in London

For Talking Business, I went around central London and spoke to UK voters about whether they had concerns about the economy.

Along with the NHS, taxes and housing were the issues that were mentioned most frequently.

Read full article Voters and businesses weigh in on Britain's post-election challenges

Raising wages, raising growth?

Workers on shop floor

We have the first indications of where economic growth is headed in the second quarter for major economies, such as the UK.

And, the initial signs are worrying as to whether there will be a growth pick-up.

Read full article Raising wages, raising growth?

Light at the end of the tunnel for Shell?

  • 30 April 2015
  • From the section Business
Shell logo

Is there light at the end of the tunnel for Shell?

That is what the Anglo-Dutch oil giant would want to see as its first quarter profits fell by a notable 56% to $3.2bn. The $7.3bn earned in the same quarter a year ago seems a distant memory, which was before the big oil plunge that began last summer.

Read full article Light at the end of the tunnel for Shell?

US growth: First casualty of a strong dollar

  • 29 April 2015
  • From the section Business
Highway signs near Clarksdale, Mississippi, US

The latest GDP figures for the US shows the economy has virtually ground to a halt as first quarter growth was just 0.2%.

That's 0.2% growth, on an annualised basis, so that means that there was negligible growth in the first three months of the year relative to the previous quarter.

Read full article US growth: First casualty of a strong dollar

What Apple and Standard Chartered have in common

  • 28 April 2015
  • From the section Business
Apple sign

What do two big American and European multinational corporations have in common? Not much on the surface when comparing consumer giant Apple to the FTSE-listed Standard Chartered bank.

However, both have been significantly affected by emerging markets in their first-quarter earnings. And how they've been affected is revealing of the way emerging economies have matured, particularly in Asia.

Read full article What Apple and Standard Chartered have in common

Why trade tops the agenda as Abe meets Obama

  • 28 April 2015
  • From the section Business
Japanese PM Shinzo Abe

Could the biggest free trade area in the world be announced this week?

Well, that's the ambition that sits at the top of the agenda as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe undertakes a week-long trip to Washington, though a final announcement is unlikely to be this week.

Read full article Why trade tops the agenda as Abe meets Obama

America's place in a multi-polar world

  • 27 April 2015
  • From the section Business
US President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands

At a global conference a few years ago, former US Treasury Secretary Larry Summers revealed that Americans would really prefer to be the G1.

Not the G7 grouping of the biggest economies, or even the G3, but the G1 - where America would be the sole decision-maker. It may not be too surprising since the US has been the sole economic superpower for most of the post-war period.

Read full article America's place in a multi-polar world

The Great Unbundling: Google, Uber, HBO as the “disrupters”

  • 23 April 2015
  • From the section Business
Google sign

Google and Uber are the latest tech companies to disrupt how services are provided. "Unbundling" describes how mobile technologies and social media are affecting the products offered by traditional businesses.

Google as a mobile phone company

Google's "Project Fi" is offering mobile phone services on its Nexus phones. It launches the web search engine into the mobile phone industry with a competitively priced offering: $20 per month for phone and texts and another $10 for data services.

Read full article The Great Unbundling: Google, Uber, HBO as the “disrupters”

Malaysian trade minister rules out single currency for Asean

  • 20 April 2015
  • From the section Business
Panel at 2015 World Economic Forum, Linda Yueh talking to Mustapa Mohamed
The 2015 World Economic Forum in Jakarta is putting the spotlight on South East Asia's largest economies

The Malaysian Minister for International Trade and Industry, Mustapa Mohamed, told the BBC that the single market that the 10 nations of South East Asia (Asean) are forming by the end of the year will not include a single currency in their deliberations.

Mr Mohamed told me at the World Economic Forum in Jakarta that a single monetary policy was out of the question in the near future, as we discussed lessons from the European experience that could apply to the Asean Economic Community (AEC) that is due to launch at the end of year.

Read full article Malaysian trade minister rules out single currency for Asean