Have New York's struggles shaped the Trump campaign?

Media captionDonald Trump is expected to is expected to win by a big margin in New York.

His name is emblazoned all over the city. On luxury condominiums, high-rise residential buildings, office blocks and hotels, and at some of New York's most prestigious addresses, Fifth Avenue, Wall Street, Park Avenue, the United Nations Plaza and even the ice rink in Central Park.

TRUMP, often spelt out in gold capital letters in a font called Stymie Bold, is ubiquitous.

But as well as being the place where he built his corporate and personal brand, the politics of Donald Trump can also be traced back to New York.

Manhattan was the site not only of the destruction of the Twin Towers in September 2001 but also the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008.

All these years on from 9/11 and the financial crash, those massive convulsions continue to shape the contours of American politics. In this mad as hell election, much of Donald Trump's success has come from exploiting fears about Islamist terrorism and frustrations about the economy.

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UN secretary general: The other New York race

New Year's Eve celebrations in Times Square, New York City Image copyright AFP
Image caption The turn of the year will mark the beginning of the new UN secretary general's term

As the hoopla of the presidential campaign comes to New York, featuring the political all-stars seeking to become the world's most powerful leader, another race is also under way in the city - a contest of the largely obscure.

It involves candidates hoping to become the world's most prominent diplomat.

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Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton and the 'None of the Above' era in politics

Donald Trump Image copyright Getty Images

As the world looks on askance at the freakishness of the US presidential election, it is worth bearing in mind that a large number of Americans feel much the same sense of unease.

To outside eyes, the rise of Donald Trump especially looks like the ultimate "Only in America" story, but many of his compatriots wish it was a "Not in America" phenomenon.

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How did Obama and Cameron fall out?

Obama and Cameron looking in opposite directions Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Seeing things differently - President Obama expressed frustrations with British foreign policy

Barack Obama has revealed his frustration with aspects of Britain's foreign policy under David Cameron. What does it mean for US-UK relations?

Last week was the 70th anniversary of the speech in which Winston Churchill coined the phrase "special relationship" (an oration at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, which, incidentally, also lodged "iron curtain" in the diplomatic lexicon). In the intervening decades, Downing Street has obsessed about its status. These are the most sacred words in British diplomacy. Maintaining an intimate friendship with Washington has been the bedrock of post-war British foreign policy.

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Could Trump's vulgarity cost him the nomination?

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets reporters in the spin room following a debate sponsored by Fox News at the Fox Theatre on March 3, 2016 in Detroit, Michigan Image copyright Getty Images

Stray penises have long been a problem for presidential aspirants, but ordinarily candidates try to conceal the evidence rather than boast about the dimensions of their manhood.

Donald Trump's decision to do so in a televised debate last Thursday, in response to childish taunts from Marco Rubio that the size of his stubby fingers was indicative of other bodily endowments, may well come to be regarded as a turning point in the race - the moment when his bawdy, frat boy boastfulness impeded his path to the Republican nomination.

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Why we should have seen Trump coming

Chris Christie and Donald Trump Image copyright Getty Images

On Super Tuesday Donald Trump's hostile takeover of the Republican Party should come even closer, and like stiff-collared executives in some wood-panelled boardroom trying belatedly to fight off a corporate raid, the GOP high command seems incapable of stopping him.

For them, Super Tuesday could become Black Tuesday. Friday must have been gloomy enough, when Chris Christie, supposedly a card-carrying member of the establishment, kissed Donald Trump's hands and gave this political outsider his endorsement.

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The crisis of US governability

Justice Antonin Scalia Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Justice Scalia's death has pushed Washington politics into overdrive

As a case study in Washington dysfunction, the battle over who should fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court left by the death of Antonin Scalia is hard to better.

It brings into collision the three branches of the US government, the executive, the legislative and the judicial. It exposes the extreme partisanship that has become the hallmark of Washington politics.

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Donald Trump turns notoriety into a win

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump walks on stage to speak after Primary day at his election night watch party at the Executive Court Banquet facility on February 9, 2016 in Manchester, New Hampshire. Trump was projected the Republican winner shortly after the polls closed Image copyright Getty Images

So Donald J Trump has sealed the deal.

The billionaire has shown in New Hampshire that he can turn publicity, controversy, even notoriety, into a winning margin of votes - indeed, a large winning margin.

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American exceptionalism in a time of American malaise

Statue of Liberty

Though a Frenchman was the first person to describe America as "exceptional" and a Soviet, Joseph Stalin, inadvertently helped popularise the phrase "American exceptionalism" - he called it a "heresy" - the notion the United States is not just unique but superior has long been an article of national faith.

Writing in Democracy in America, which set out to explain why the American Revolution had succeeded while the French Revolution had failed, Alexis de Tocqueville observed Americans were "quite exceptional", by which he meant different rather than better.

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Does America need to change how it elects its presidents?

Audience member Robin Roy reacts as Donald Trump greets her at a campaign rally in Lowell, 4 January 2016 Image copyright Reuters

Is there a greater democratic show on earth than the American presidential election?

Indian polls, where elephants ferry electronic voting machines into the foothills of the Himalayas and pyrotechnics explode at the moment of victory, are doubtless more picturesque.

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