Nick Robinson, Political editor

Nick Robinson Political editor

Welcome to Newslog - come here for my reflections and analysis on what's going on in and around politics

UKIP - power struggle, not soap opera

Nigel Farage at a polling booth in May
Mr Farage is hoping to hold the balance of power after May's general election

A parliamentary candidate resigns having tried blaming his racist comments on taking painkillers.

This comes days after an alleged sex scandal at UKIP head office in which the party's chief executive did - or did not - sleep with another candidate.

Meantime a wealthy donor is said to be threatening to stop funding the party if his friend doesn't get a seat.

You may think that UKIP's week of bad headlines is just a diverting soap opera.

You may think it simply shows the growing pains of Britain's fastest growing political force. You may think it has no significance at all. If so, you'd be wrong.

Read full article UKIP - power struggle, not soap opera

The speech that remembered the deficit

Ed Miliband

Just weeks after the speech which forgot the deficit comes the speech that remembers it - big time.

Ed Miliband knows he has a problem and can sense an opportunity.

Read full article The speech that remembered the deficit

Osborne on voters' choice in 2015: Competence or chaos

A "price that works for our country". That's how George Osborne describes the deep spending cuts which he claims are needed to cut the deficit.

Speaking to me in Manchester, the Chancellor said that "the prize is economic stability, growth, jobs in the future, a brighter future".

Read full article Osborne on voters' choice in 2015: Competence or chaos

Autumn Statement: A pre-election Budget

George Osborne

In all but name this was a pre-election Budget.

From his first to his last sentence - from boasting about Britain's growth to unveiling the Coalition's version of the mansion tax - Chancellor George Osborne delivered his Autumn Statement with not just one eye but both fixed firmly on polling day.

Read full article Autumn Statement: A pre-election Budget

Spend, spend, spend – what are politicians up to?

Stack of £1 coins

Spend spend spend. That's what people do who can afford to, at this time of the year. Why though are our politicians following suit when the country is still deeply in the red?

Today - on the morning after that NHS spending promise before - the coalition pledged to spend billions more upgrading Britain's road network.

Read full article Spend, spend, spend – what are politicians up to?

Disarming the NHS as a political threat

George Osborne, centre, with Ed Balls, left, on the Andrew Marr Show
George Osborne, centre, and Ed Balls, left, are both pledging NHS increases

Disarming the greatest threat to their election chances. That, at least in part, is what the announcement of a promise of £2 billion for the NHS is all about.

For months ministers have worried about the mounting evidence of an NHS under mounting strain.

Read full article Disarming the NHS as a political threat

David Cameron changes tactics over immigration

David Cameron

Control. Control of who comes here. Control of what benefits they receive.

That's what David Cameron said the people were demanding on the morning after that broken immigration promise.

Read full article David Cameron changes tactics over immigration

Analysis: David Cameron's 'agonising' EU immigration speech

Immigration official

It is a speech which David Cameron and his advisers have agonised over for months.

Ideas for it have been floated in the media, tested in capitals across Europe, debated with civil servants and, no doubt, market tested as well.

Read full article Analysis: David Cameron's 'agonising' EU immigration speech

Why change in Scotland will change the whole UK

Lord Smith presents his recommendations

If you think today's constitutional changes are only about Scotland, think again.

If you think they mark the end of a process of change, think again.

Read full article Why change in Scotland will change the whole UK

Labour to private schools: Help others or pay more tax

Pupils at Eton College
Some private schools already sponsor state counterparts but Labour says many more should do so

"Step up and play your part. Earn your keep". Or you'll pay more in tax. That is Labour's new message to private schools.

Shadow Education Secretary Tristram Hunt wants them to provide qualified teachers in specialist subjects to state schools; share their expertise to help state school students get into top universities and to run joint extra-curricular programmes with local schools.

Read full article Labour to private schools: Help others or pay more tax

More Correspondents

  • Robert Peston, economics editor Robert Peston Economics editor

    Latest on events, trends and issues in the economy


  • James Landale James Landale Deputy political editor

    Who is saying what to whom at Westminster and why it matters


  • Martin Rosenbaum, Freedom of information specialist Martin Rosenbaum Freedom of information specialist

    Thoughts on FoI and the issues it raises


  • Mark D'Arcy, Parliamentary correspondent Mark D'Arcy Parliamentary correspondent

    Inside the chambers and committee rooms of Westminster


About Nick

Nick started blogging about politics for the BBC in 2001 when he was one of the earliest mainstream journalists in the UK to adopt the format.

He has been in his current role since 2005.

Before he was political editor, he did the same job at ITV News, before which he was chief political correspondent for BBC News 24, deputy editor of Panorama and a presenter on BBC Radio 5 live.

He began his time at the BBC behind the microphone, starting as a trainee producer in 1986 on Brass Tacks, Newsround and Crimewatch.

Based at Westminster, he has particular responsibility for serving the flagship news programmes, including Today on Radio 4 and the Ten O'Clock News on BBC One.

Born in Macclesfield, Cheshire in 1963, he attended Cheadle Hulme School, followed by University College, Oxford where he studied politics, philosophy and economics.

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