Are universities secretly sexist?

  • 21 September 2016
  • From the section Business
Elizabeth Nyamayaro
Image caption Elizabeth Nyamayaro says universities must act to ensure more women professors

Universities might have a reputation as bastions of Guardian-reading liberalism.

But when it comes to the top academic jobs they stand accused of failing to give women a fair chance.

In the UK, only 24% of professors are women, even though half of lecturers are women. There are even fewer female university heads, with women accounting for 18% of vice chancellors or principals.

This isn't unique to the UK - a report from the United Nations shows a similar pattern of a lack of female professors across universities in the United States, Japan, China, Brazil, France and South Africa.

Elizabeth Nyamayaro, senior adviser to UN Women, says there needs to be direct intervention to change this, including the controversial idea of imposing quotas.

Read full article Are universities secretly sexist?

Harvard's new students: Virgins with iPhones

  • 14 September 2016
  • From the section Business
Harvard Image copyright Thinkstock
Image caption Students arriving at Harvard are a mix of traditional values and new technology

Virgins with iPhones - well, most of them are virgins and even more of them have iPhones. And among the men, they are more likely to take LSD than smoke cigarettes.

These are the future business and political leaders of the United States. Or at least, they are the newest intake into Harvard, the wealthiest university in the world and a cradle of the American elite.

Read full article Harvard's new students: Virgins with iPhones

Did grammar schools help social mobility?

Theresa May Image copyright EPA
Image caption Theresa May has highlighted that "selection by house price" was also unfair

The argument for expanding grammar schools in England makes two big claims - that it will improve choice for families and support social mobility.

The arguments against grammars are the precise opposite of this - that expanding grammars will leave most families with less chance of a good school and drive social division.

Read full article Did grammar schools help social mobility?

'London is most educated city in Europe'

  • 24 August 2016
  • From the section Business
Canary Wharf Image copyright Thinkstock
Image caption Is London going to be a new kind of city state, based on a graduate economy

Where in Europe would you expect to find the highest concentration of graduates?

Would it be a particularly earnest quarter of Oslo? Or an erudite corner of Finland or Germany?

Read full article 'London is most educated city in Europe'

Worse results, more students, on A-level day

A-level results Image copyright PA
Image caption The good news and bad news will have arrived with A-level results

The long wait for A-level results is over.

Teenagers and their families will have found out the good news and the disappointments.

Read full article Worse results, more students, on A-level day

Are grammar schools about to make a comeback?

Justine Greening Image copyright EPA
Image caption Education Secretary Justine Greening faces calls from her own party to allow more grammars to be created

Grammar schools are back on the agenda with a grassroots Conservative group about to launch a campaign for their return.

But if Theresa May's government gave a political green light to such a controversial proposal, how might it happen?

Read full article Are grammar schools about to make a comeback?

Universities want funding clarity on Brexit and fees

Graduation
Image caption Fees and Brexit: The universities minister will face questions over funding

In the high-minded, intellectual world of higher education, there seems to be one thing that really matters - money.

The big questions for Jo Johnson, returning as universities minister, will revolve around funding and fees - and it won't always be easy to provide answers.

Read full article Universities want funding clarity on Brexit and fees

Big school decisions waiting for green light from Greening

Justine Greening Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Justine Greening will have to decide what to do with school plans already published

New secretaries of state always face talk of what's waiting in the in-tray.

But for Justine Greening, Theresa May's education secretary, the first question will be what to do with the bulging out-tray.

Read full article Big school decisions waiting for green light from Greening

MPs rebel by refusing new Ofsted chief

Amanda Spielman
Image caption Amanda Spielman has been rejected by MPs as the next head of Ofsted

The permanent revolution in political life is everywhere.

It's even reached the shores of the education watchdog, Ofsted. Against all expectations, the officially nominated new chief inspector of schools has been turned down by the Education Select Committee.

Read full article MPs rebel by refusing new Ofsted chief

Will Ofsted be less independent without Wilshaw?

Michael Wilshaw Image copyright PA
Image caption After Sir Michael Wilshaw steps down will Ofsted have a less independent voice?

Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Education, Children's Services and Skills - otherwise known as the head of Ofsted - is in the process of changing identity.

Rather like the arrival of a new Doctor Who, the role is the same, but it will look and sound completely different with someone else playing the part.

Read full article Will Ofsted be less independent without Wilshaw?