Does Cameron's university claim stack up?

David Cameron Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption David Cameron wants universities to do more for social mobility

Are young black males really more likely to be in prison than in leading universities?

That was the claim of Prime Minister David Cameron at the weekend as he raised his lance at the closed doors of top universities.

"If you're a young black man, you're more likely to be in a prison cell than studying at a top university," wrote Mr Cameron, in an article in the Sunday Times.

The striking headline claim was used as an example to show that "blatant racism" might have diminished, but there were still "under the surface", residual layers of discrimination.

It's a powerful contrast, but is it really the case? It might be the right cause, but is it the right statistic?

Read full article Does Cameron's university claim stack up?

Oxford Rhodes statue row is part of global protest

Rhodes statue Image copyright Reuters
Image caption The Rhodes statue is going to remain on the front of Oriel College

How did a statue of a 19th Century politician on the front of a 14th Century college become such a 21st Century argument?

The decision by Oxford University's Oriel College to keep its statue of Cecil Rhodes was meant to draw a line under an angry dispute over emblems, cultural identity and how universities should deal with their own long histories.

Read full article Oxford Rhodes statue row is part of global protest

Is the UK really in Scandinavia?

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The UK has been caught in a long tug-of-war about its identity, which will only become more intense as the EU referendum approaches.

Where does the UK belong in the world?

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Are cities the new countries?

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Image caption Are big cities becoming more like separate countries?

Do big cities have more in common with each other than with the rest of their own countries?

Are there meaningful comparisons between cities such as New York, London and Shanghai, rather than between nation states?

Read full article Are cities the new countries?

Does the UK give more aid than other countries?

Refugee in Greece Image copyright AP
Image caption The refugee crisis brought extra demands on aid budgets

The UK gives more in international aid than any other developed country apart from the United States, according to figures from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

And in terms of donations as a proportion of national income, the UK is in the top five, behind countries such as Sweden and Norway.

Read full article Does the UK give more aid than other countries?

Can social mobility work in a selfie culture?

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Image caption Where does social mobility fit in with selfies and celebrities?

Everyone is in favour of social mobility. And everyone says it's a terrible thing that there isn't more of it.

But why does the aspiration for a fairer system never seem to arrive?

Read full article Can social mobility work in a selfie culture?

Teacher shortage 'becoming a classroom crisis'

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Image caption Tens of thousands of teachers leave the profession each year

"The word 'crisis' is not an exaggeration," says Brian Lightman, leader of the ASCL head teachers' union.

Mr Lightman, not usually given to scaremongering, is warning about the shortage of that most vital ingredient in a school - the teachers.

Read full article Teacher shortage 'becoming a classroom crisis'

Will students get 'value for money'?

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Image caption Record numbers of students: Graduation at London South Bank University last month

A cynical colleague once said there were only two stories from universities:

1) Universities say it will be a disaster if they don't get more public money

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Why are coastal schools at such a low ebb?

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Image caption Seaside towns have faced rising tides of deprivation

Is where you live the key defining feature in being in an underachieving school? Is geography the new poverty?

The rise of London as an education superpower, succeeding despite high levels of deprivation, has redrawn the map of expectations in school achievement.

Read full article Why are coastal schools at such a low ebb?

What lessons from Trojan Horse case?

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Image caption What happened at Park View school in Birmingham remains disputed

More than 18 months after the Trojan Horse allegations first made the headlines, the arguments over claims of a take-over of Birmingham schools are being fought out in a series of disciplinary hearings.

The claims of an organised covert attempt to impose a hardline Muslim ethos on a group of state schools emerged in a letter describing a so-called Operation Trojan Horse.

Read full article What lessons from Trojan Horse case?