University postgraduate system 'failing UK economy'

 
Laboratory The report says the UK's economy needs more home-grown postgraduate researchers

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The postgraduate system in the UK's universities is failing to produce the number of highly skilled staff needed by a modern economy, a report warns.

The Higher Education Commission says the system is geared towards attracting overseas students, rather than training more UK students.

The report warns that the UK is falling behind in investing in research.

A Department for Business, Innovation and Skills spokeswoman said: "We recognise there are some concerns."

The study from the Higher Education Commission calls for urgent reform of the postgraduate sector, saying that in its present state it will cause long-term problems for the UK's economy.

Postgraduate research has become increasingly important for innovative, hi-tech industries.

Tuition fees

But the Higher Education Commission, an independent group of education and business leaders, warns that the UK's current system seems to neglect UK students and instead is driven by universities wanting to recruit overseas students who pay high levels of tuition fees.

It says this risks making the UK the "education outsourcing capital of the world" - training international students rather than providing home-grown talent for UK firms.

Start Quote

The postgraduate sector needs to be brought in from the cold”

End Quote Graham Spittle Higher Education Commission and IBM chief technology officer

Without an expansion of UK postgraduate students, it will mean UK firms will have to recruit more staff from overseas - or even have to re-locate to countries with a higher skilled workforce, the report says.

"We can't compete with countries like China and India on numbers, but we can compete, and win, on ideas and innovation. The postgraduate sector needs to be brought in from the cold and hardwired into the UK's strategy for economic growth," said Graham Spittle, IBM's chief technology officer, who chaired the group preparing the report.

The report identifies the scale of the growth of overseas postgraduate students - up 200% since 1999 - compared with a rise of 18% for UK students.

Within the group of countries in the wider European education area, it says that apart from England and Wales, the only other countries to have so few home students staying on for postgraduate are Andorra and Kazakhstan.

It calls for a reform of the support available for postgraduate students - so that they will not be deterred by higher tuition fees or difficulties in getting loans.

Earlier this year a report from the 1994 Group of research intensive universities warned of a looming crisis in postgraduate education - with a warning that successive governments had failed to address the problems facing this sector.

The vice chancellor of Oxford University has also highlighted his concerns about the funding of postgraduate studies.

A Department for Business, Innovation and Skills spokeswoman said: "We have asked the Higher Education Funding Council for England to monitor and review participation in postgraduate study as part of a longer-term assessment of the impact of the funding changes."

 

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  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 245.

    Quite frankly, the anti-intellectualism, low-pay after years of toil, and derision doled out to educated people by people who know the value of everything and the worth of nothing, in all aspects of UK society makes this almost intractable. I still hear so-called "celebs" boasting how innumerate they are in the media, and they are unchallenged, but it should be shameful for them to admit this!

  • rate this
    +7

    Comment number 225.

    Its the fee's, I just graduated from Newcastle University (Undergrad) but looked at doing a postgrad, it wasn't the cost of 10'000 that put me off, it was the fact one has to take out a bank loan to finance it. Its far less attractive that Student Loan service for undergrad. So if you want more postgrad students from the UK extend Student Finance to Postgrad.

  • rate this
    +9

    Comment number 215.

    As a professor in a top UK university science department I spend a very large proportion of my time seeking funding for postgraduate students' maintenance, fees and laboratory expenses. The simple fact is that science research and science research education is expensive and unless it is paid for it doesn't occur. If, as a nation, we want British postgraduate students, we have to fund them.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 110.

    I left school in the 70's aged 17 with 5 GCE 'O' levels, good grades in proper subjects, I started at the bottom rung of a major electronics company and obtained ONC HNC at night school. I progressed up the ladder until in the 90's I was at Board level. This was not uncommon, a large proportion of the Board had taken this route. What was needed were practical skills not a degree in media studies.

  • rate this
    -48

    Comment number 105.

    As a post grad from a top four university i can say this is absolute rubbish. I have had no trouble getting my dream job at an investment fund. The jobs are out there but either people are too lazy to go find them or are simply under qulaified for the jobs they are aiming for. This culture of blaming someone else for your own failings need to stop. The jobs are out there!

 

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