New before- and after-school childcare plans expected

Children There was a large expansion in out-of-school care between 1990 and 2000

Related Stories

Ministers are expected shortly to set out plans to tackle the shortage and affordability of before and after-school care for children in England.

The government's Commission on Childcare took evidence last summer on how to overcome the barriers to parents accessing such care.

It is expected to change the rules covering unregistered carers looking after children and the premises used.

Schools are also likely to be urged to work more closely with private firms.

It comes after a report this week from the Family and Childcare Trust warned that more children could be left home alone this summer because of rises in fees and a shortage of places.

'Flexibility'

But the issue of a lack of holiday and after-school care is a long-standing one that has troubled many parents.

In the early 1990s, there was an unprecedented expansion in out-of-school care, with the number of settings increasing from several hundred to an estimated 5,000 in England by 2002.

But a lack of support and sustainability has led to many closures of breakfast clubs and holiday play schemes. And this means that in some parts of the country there is a severe lack of access to after-school care.

The Pre-School Learning Alliance, which represents 14,000 day nurseries, pre-schools, and parent and toddler groups warned in their response to the consultation: "The current economic climate is seeing many parents working longer hours, which often mean early starts, late finishes and/or changing shift patterns.

"Wraparound and holiday provision is not always flexible enough to encompass these changing work patterns, or if the childcare is there it is expensive for those early or late hours."

It added: "Several of our members have commented on the diminution of support over recent years from their traditional representative organisation. The re-establishment of a provision champion seems to be needed."

One of the problems is that different families have different routines and so have different needs from the same provider, said the alliance.

"Some working parents with school-age children need a weekday breakfast club before school and an after-school club to look after their children from 15:30 until early evening, as well as a holiday club during the school holidays for approximately 14 weeks per year."

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More Education & Family stories

RSS

Features & Analysis

  • Dr Mahinder Watsa Dr Sex

    The wisecracking 90-year-old whose advice column is a cult hit


  • Payton McKinnonKilling heat

    Why so many American children die in hot cars


  • Vice-President Joe Biden.Joe v Hillary

    What needs to happen for Biden to be the next president


  • USA fanSoccer punch

    Has the US finally fallen in love with the beautiful game? BBC Sport


Elsewhere on the BBC

  • Kyoto.Falling for Kyoto

    Acclaimed writer Pico Iyer describes an enchanting first stroll through the city

Programmes

  • (File photo) Usain BoltClick Watch

    Challenging the world's fastest man to a virtual race over 40m – can you keep up?

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.