Election 2015

Election 2015: The manifesto launch venues and what they say

Political parties spend months and months poring over the content of their election manifestos - but almost as much time is spent on finding the perfect setting to launch it in. With the last of the documents unveiled on Monday, we take a look at what the venues say about the parties.

The Scottish National Party

Image copyright Reuters

SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon launched her party's manifesto on Monday at the Edinburgh International Climbing Arena, beneath a banner proclaiming: "Stronger for Scotland". Subtle it was not but the party's message was clear - even if Ms Sturgeon tried to laugh off a question about the English being scared of her.

Image copyright Twitter
Image copyright Twitter

The Conservatives

Image copyright Getty Images

The SNP's adventurous setting raised a few eyebrows, but the site of the Tory launch surprised no one. Speaking in front of a Union Jack flag at a technical college in Swindon, David Cameron sought to display the kind of authority that only a prime minister can.

But it was heavily stage-managed presentation and any threat of excitement from a brief Q&A was killed when journalists were stopped from being too inquisitive.

Image copyright Twitter

Unlike Edinburgh, the crowd did not go wild.

Image copyright Twitter

The Labour Party

Image copyright AFP

Ed Miliband says he wants to help "working people succeed" so it was no surprise he launched his manifesto in an area famous for its hard working people. What was a surprise was that the area he chose was the set of ITV's long-running soap Coronation Street in Manchester.

Maybe it was because Ed Balls had so much fun there at a post-conference party in September. Maybe not.

Image copyright Twitter
Image copyright Twitter

The Liberal Democrats

Image copyright PA

The Lib Dems have been doing their best to win back some of the younger voters they lost after their tuition fees U-turn. So it seemed perfectly normal that Nick Clegg would launch his party's manifesto in a south London night club-esque venue beneath what appeared to be neon glow-sticks.

Still, it was cooler than Coronation Street.

Image copyright Twitter
Image copyright Twitter

The Green Party

Image copyright Getty Images

If the Lib Dems were aiming for cool, the Greens were hoping for hip. Mr Clegg may have had exposed brick walls, but Natalie Bennett and Caroline Lucas had original wooden flooring and that edgy warehouse feel.

They unveiled their pledges at the Arcola Theatre in east London's trendy Dalston to a crowd that included a toddler. And it was all going fine until journalists asked for an actual copy of the manifesto.

Image copyright Twitter
Image copyright Twitter

The UK Independence Party

Image copyright Getty Images

Nigel Farage has positioned himself as the honest man of British politics and UKIP sought to build on that brand at the launch of their document at a no-frills hotel in their Essex heartland.

The venue holds regular Fawlty Towers nights, but there were no comic mishaps here as Mr Farage presented a more professional manifesto than the party's 2010 offering, which he once described as "drivel".

Image copyright Twitter
Image copyright Twitter

More on this story