Election 2015 Scotland

Manifesto launch: Scottish Green Party unveils 'bold vision'

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media captionThe Scottish Green Party has published its general election manifesto

The Scottish Greens said they had a "bold vision" for Scotland on the day they published their general election manifesto.

The party revealed three key themes - to end poverty; to keep public services in public hands and to give more power to local communities.

They said they could send "principled" voices to Westminster to "speak up" for people in Scotland.

Voters throughout the UK will go to the polls on 7 May to choose their next MP.

The Scottish Greens are fielding candidates in 32 of the 59 Scottish constituencies.

Minimum wage

Co-convenors Patrick Harvie MSP and Councillor Maggie Chapman both spoke at the Edinburgh launch of the party's manifesto.

Following last year's referendum, the pro-independence supporting party saw an increase in membership, which now stands at about 8,500.

It has made clear it wants an "end to austerity" and would like the minimum wage to be raised to £10 an hour by 2020.

The party backs an environmentally-friendly economy relying less on fossil fuels.

It is also a believer in free university tuition; wants a non-repayable student grant and is fully behind a free publicly available NHS.

Mr Harvie said: "Everyone is tired of the same old Westminster politics.

"Scotland is ready for change and people are eager to vote for ideas they can believe in.

"The Green membership surge means we're in a strong position to send principled voices to speak up for Scotland's communities.

"Our bold vision for Scotland and the UK is a compelling offer that others simply can't match."

Image caption The Scottish Green Party published its manifesto on day one of the official election campaign

Ms Chapman added: "With a £10 minimum wage we could ensure no-one works in a job that keeps them in poverty.

"By rolling back benefits cuts and lifting the punishing sanctions regime, we can restore a society with compassion.

"And with real powers devolved to Scotland and to local communities we can put people not big business in control."


More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites