Scotland Election 2016

Holyrood 2016: Campaign focus on jobs and education

Kez GoKart
Image caption Kezia Dugdale campaigned at a play centre in Glasgow

Jobs and education were the focus of the penultimate day of campaigning for the Holyrood election.

SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon addressed Aberdeen business leaders on how her party plans to create more jobs.

Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale warned about cuts to education, as did will Liberal Democrat leader Willie Rennie during a visit to Renfrew.

Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson travelled from Oban to Peterhead to canvass for votes.

And Patrick Harvie and Maggie Chapman of the Scottish Greens visited Fife College where they highlighted the potential for new jobs in renewable industries.


What is in the manifestos?

Scotland's political parties have now published their manifestos ahead of the Holyrood election on 5 May. So, what are they pledging?


Ahead of campaigning on Monday, Ms Sturgeon said that job creation would be at the heart of a re-elected SNP government's agenda.

She added: "As we have shown in recent months, we will relentlessly champion Scottish business and always stand up for our key industries.

"And the only way people in Scotland can be sure of re-electing an SNP government with a bold, ambitious plan to create new and better-paid jobs is to cast both votes for the SNP on Thursday."

Voters go to the polls on Thursday to elect their new constituency and regional list MSPs.

Image copyright SNP / Twitter
Image caption Nicola Sturgeon met a man celebrating his 100th birthday while out campaigning
Image caption Ruth Davidson was ferried around the country in a helicopter

Ms Dugdale visited a soft play area in Glasgow where she is expected to warn of the threat "the SNP's £3bn of cuts" could have on education and frontline services.

She said: "The SNP must now come clean on their secret cuts by telling voters where the axe would fall.

"A vote for Labour is a vote to use the new powers of the Scottish Parliament to tax the richest 1% so we can invest in schools and stop the cuts to public services. A vote for the SNP is a vote for cuts to children's education, cuts to frontline services and cutting jobs."

'Ready to step up'

The Scottish Conservatives hired a helicopter to take Ms Davidson from coast to coast where she will try to convince voters that she is the one opposition leader who can challenge the SNP.

She said: "Many people are supporting me because they just want an opposition at Holyrood which will really hold the SNP to account for once. Labour has had its chance - I am ready to step up and do a job for Scotland."

Image caption Willie Rennie was playing crazy golf in Glasgow

Mr Rennie insisted that the SNP had had nine years to "get to grips" with the challenges facing public services.

He added: "Everywhere I go, people tell me that they are pleased that we are talking about big issues like education and mental health that were neglected while the SNP campaigned for independence.

"The last thing Scotland needs is a groundhog day debate on the constitution."

With just two full days of campaigning to go, the Scottish Greens were keen to underline their manifesto commitment to "invest in skills and new jobs".

The party's co-convener Mr Harvie said: "Scotland's economy is facing huge challenges, not least from the inevitable decline in the oil and gas sectors, so the need for a plan of action has never been greater.

"Today's visit [to Fife College] underlines the Scottish Green Party's manifesto commitment to investment in skills and new jobs that will last."

Image copyright Scottish Greens / Twitter
Image caption Green co-convenors Patrick Harvie and Maggie Chapman inspected wind turbine parts in Fife

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