General election 2017: Corbyn's plans emerge in leaked manifesto

Jeremy Corbyn Image copyright Reuters

So here it is.

Forty-five pages that reveal Jeremy Corbyn's plans to transform the country if he can persuade enough voters that he is the man to be PM, and his vision is the best way forward.

In a draft of Labour's manifesto, seen by the BBC, is a long, long list of plans, ideas - some new, some predictable, some rather more surprising.

Before going on, it's worth saying it is yet to be signed off as a final version - that's due to happen in a meeting tomorrow of Labour bigwigs.

But from what we have seen, which Labour senior figures acknowledge "is the real thing" subject to a few last minute tweaks, it is a rundown that will be manna from heaven for Jeremy Corbyn's supporters, contains ideas that poll well with swathes of voters, but could be a challenge to the concept of pleasing much of the traditional centre ground of "Middle England".

The draft manifesto promises to scrap tuition fees, to ban fracking, to bring back national pay bargaining in some industries and only to consider military action where all other options have "been exhausted".

It suggests bringing some energy "back into public ownership", with a strong emphasis on renewables and a promise to introduce an "immediate emergency price cap" to keep average bills below £1,000.

Image caption The draft manifesto has yet to be signed off

It promises to suspend arms sales immediately to Saudi Arabia, to cut the voting age to 16, to increase tax on the wealthiest 5%.

There are notable big contrasts with Conservative plans - no target on cutting immigration, a warning there will be "no false promises", and guarantees, rather than cutting welfare, that payments to some groups will see rises.

There could yet be changes to these ideas. Labour big cheeses will discuss and dissect the plans tomorrow. But it's clear as day that this will be an election where voters will not be able to say "they're all the same".