X Factor winner James Arthur returns to number one

James Arthur Sales of Impossible mean James Arthur is the most successful X Factor winner since Alexandra Burke in 2008.

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X Factor winner James Arthur has returned to the top of the singles chart, a week after missing out on the Christmas number one spot.

The Middlesbrough singer's single Impossible topped of the charts on its release earlier this month.

But it was beaten to the festive top spot by the Hillsborough disaster tribute single, He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother by the Justice Collective.

The chart-topping track, featuring Sir Paul McCartney, fell to number five.

The single, a cover of the 1969 Hollies' hit, is raising money for the families of 96 Liverpool fans who died in a crush at Hillsborough stadium in 1989. It features artists including Robbie Williams, former Spice Girl Mel C and Gerry Marsden.

Will.i.am's Scream & Shout, featuring Britney Spears, stands at number two this week, with Psy's Gangnam Style in third place and Olly Murs' Trouble at number four.

Murs' latest album, Right Place Right Time, was also in second place in the album chart this week.

But it was Emeli Sande, who became the voice of London 2012 after she sang in the Olympics opening and closing ceremonies, who remained at the top of the album charts.

The Scottish singer's Our Version Of Events is the biggest-selling album of the year, with sales of more than 1.32 million.

Rihanna's Unapologetic was at number three and Michael Buble's Christmas album was in fourth place. At number five was Bruno Mars' Unorthodox Jukebox.

The Bruno Mars album became the fastest-selling solo album of 2012 with 136,000 sales in its first week earlier this month, according to the Official Chart Company.

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