Bonnie Tyler chosen as Eurovision UK entry

 

Watch Bonnie Tyler's music video Believe in Me

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Welsh pop singer Bonnie Tyler has been confirmed as the UK representative at the 2013 Eurovision Song Contest.

The 61-year-old, best known for her 1983 hit Total Eclipse of the Heart, said she was "honoured" to be asked.

"I promise to give this everything that I've got for the UK!" she said in a statement.

Tyler will be performing the song, Believe in Me, in front of an estimated 120 million viewers in Malmo, Sweden, on 18 May.

"I am truly honoured and delighted to be able to represent my country at Eurovision, and especially with such a fabulous song," said Tyler.

Bonnie Tyler in 1984 Tyler, pictured here in 1984, promised she would "give this everything"

The UK entry for the 58th Eurovision Song Contest was written by American songwriter Desmond Child with British songwriters Lauren Christy and Christopher Braide.

Child has worked with Tyler throughout her career, and has also written hits for rock bands Kiss and Bon Jovi.

He also penned the Ricky Martin hits Livin' La Vida Loca and She Bangs.

"Bonnie Tyler is truly a global superstar with a fantastic voice," said Katie Taylor, BBC Controller, Entertainment and Events.

"We are delighted she will be flying the flag for the UK in Malmo."

Last year's entry, Love Will Set You Free by Engelbert Humperdinck, finished second from last with just 12 points.

Tyler is the first Welsh act to represent the UK at Eurovision since James Fox in 2004, whose song, Hold On to Our Love, finished in 16th place.

The UK last won the Eurovision in 1997 when Katrina and the Waves received 227 points for their song Love Shine a Light.

The UK has entered the competition every year since 1959 and has won on five occasions.

In 2003, Liverpool group Jemini was the first UK entry to receive zero points for their song Cry Baby.

The UK also came last in 2008 with Andy Abraham's song, Even If, and in 2010 with Josh Dubovie's entry, That Sounds Good to Me.

Tyler, born Gaynor Hopkins in Neath, Wales, had her first hit single, Lost in France, in 1976.

She was nominated for three Grammy Awards in 1984, including best female pop vocal for Total Eclipse of the Heart.

 

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  • rate this
    +13

    Comment number 368.

    Everybody should chill out and accept that Eurovision is NOT about winning - it is all the fun at laughing at someone else and occasionally, hearing some good sounds from other cultures and even, heaven forbid, even a decent song now and then. It is like one of those films which is so bad you are compelled to watch it until the end. Just enjoy it - and if you don't like it, simply switch channels.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 348.

    Bonnie your voice is amazing but why are we still entering this "competition" no one votes for us any more and must be humiliating for the artists representing us.

  • rate this
    +33

    Comment number 137.

    Bonnie you are a class act. Yur voice has mellowed beautifully. But we don't stand a chance

  • rate this
    +12

    Comment number 120.

    Lovely song and suits Bonnie's fantastic voice too.
    I wish her well, hopefully they can see through the Politics and give her a real vote.

  • rate this
    +14

    Comment number 56.

    Wow - I like this, and a such a shrewd choice of artist. She has a wonderful voice and this song is an instant pleaser.

    If she could take the beach with her to Malmo I am sure the points would soar. I might actually watch this year . . . . .

    Oh - and if I look like this at 61 I'll be pretty chuffed.

 

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