Rolling Stones to resume world tour in May

The Rolling Stones in Singapore on 15 March The Stones last played together in Singapore on 15 March

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The Rolling Stones are to resume their world tour in May in what will be the band's first dates following the death of Sir Mick Jagger's partner.

The rock band will play 14 shows across Europe in May, June and July as part of their 14 On Fire tour, kicking off in Oslo, Norway, on 26 May.

The band cancelled seven dates in Australia and New Zealand following L'Wren Scott's death on 17 March.

The fashion designer took her own life, New York authorities have ruled.

Sir Mick Jagger with L'Wren Scott in 2006 L'Wren Scott was 49 years old at the time of her death

According to tour organisers, "every effort" is being made to reschedule the postponed dates to October and November.

Sir Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood last played together in Singapore on 15 March.

The European leg of the band's current tour will see them play at the Stade de France in Paris on 13 June and at the Bernabeu Stadium in Madrid 12 days later.

Other confirmed dates include appearances at the Lisbon incarnation of the Rock in Rio festival on 29 May and the Roskilde Festival in Denmark on 3 July.

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