Bryan Singer accuser files more sex claims

Michael Egan urged victims of sexual abuse to come forward

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A man who has claimed X-Men director Bryan Singer sexually abused him as a teenager has sued three more Hollywood figures, saying they molested him too.

Michael Egan, 31, alleges TV executives Garth Ancier, David Neuman and theatre producer Gary Goddard were part of an underage sex ring in Hollywood.

Mr Ancier's lawyer said the claims were "demonstrably untrue", while Mr Neuman called them "whole-cloth lies".

Earlier, a lawyer for Mr Goddard said the complaint was "without merit".

In allegations similar to those filed against Singer, Mr Egan claims he was lured into a sex ring in 1999 by former entertainment executive Marc Collins-Rector, a registered sex offender, with promises of auditions for acting and modelling jobs.

He alleges he was forced to have sex with adult men at "infamous and degenerate parties" in Hollywood and the abuse continued on trips to Hawaii, where he was inappropriately touched, made to consume alcohol and drugs, and forced into sex.

He is claiming $10 million (£6 million) in damages for battery, assault, invasion of privacy and intentional infliction of emotional distress.

The legal action was announced at a press conference in Los Angeles attended by Mr Egan and his mother.

"Somebody has to stand up to these people. You can't change the stigma that exists in this world against childhood sexual abuse unless someone talks about it," Mr Egan said.

His mother, Bonnie Mound, said she tried to help her son contact police and the FBI to report the abuse 14 years ago and questioned why the information he provided did not result in criminal charges.

"It's not about money. It's about disarming these paedophiles who use their wealth and power to escape justice," she said.

Bryan Singer Bryan Singer's lawyers called the claims 'absurd and defamatory'

Alan Grodin, a lawyer for Mr Goddard - who has produced several Broadway shows and created attractions at Universal Studios - said the executive had not yet seen the legal claim.

"Based on what we have heard, the allegations are without merit," Grodin said. "Once we have seen the complaint we will respond appropriately."

Mr Ancier oversaw the launch of Fox television and later worked as an executive producer for NBC and BBC America. He is credited with creating The Ricki Lake Show and 21 Jump Street.

"All of the allegations made by the plaintiff against Garth Ancier are demonstrably untrue, and we are confident the courts will agree when the evidence is presented," Ancier's lawyer, Louise Ann Fernandez, said.

"As just one of many examples, Mr Ancier has never even visited the estate in Hawaii where the plaintiff claims to have encountered him."

Mr Neuman, a former president of Walt Disney TV and chief programming officer at CNN, took to Twitter to denounce the charges as "whole-cloth lies with zero basis in reality or truth".

He said it was "sickening and very evil, for anyone to lie like that, let alone in a legal document".

Last week Mr Egan filed a legal claim against Singer, alleging the director forced him into sex during parties when Mr Egan was 17.

In response to the claim, the FBI said it could not discuss specifically what Mr Egan told them, but denied it had ignored any information about the director.

Singer's lawyer said the action was "absurd and defamatory".

"We are very confident that Bryan will be vindicated," Marty Singer, who is not related to his client, said.

He added he would be "bringing a claim for malicious prosecution" against Mr Egan and his lawyer.

Singer, 48, has directed three instalments of the X-Men franchise, including the upcoming X-Men: Days of Future Past - due to be released next month - and another instalment to be released in 2016.

His other credits include The Usual Suspects, Superman Returns and last year's Jack the Giant Slayer.

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