In Pictures

In pictures: Scottish independence referendum results

Image copyright Cathal McNaughton/reuters
Image caption Voters across Scotland headed to the polls to decide the country's future in the Scottish independence referendum. With more than 97% of the electorate registered to vote, a high turnout had been expected.
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Image caption First Minister Alex Salmond, leader of the "Yes" campaign, posed for photographers before casting his own vote in Strichen in Aberdeenshire.
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Image caption The results were eagerly awaited by all ages.
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Image caption The referendum is the first time that under-18s anywhere in the UK have been able to vote on a major matter of state.
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Image caption Former prime minister and Better Together campaigner Gordon Brown cast his vote at the North Queensferry Community Centre in Fife.
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Image caption It was a long night - these campaigners grabbed a few moments' rest once the polls closed at 22:00.
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Image caption In Glasgow's George Square it was a chance to party. When the results came in later in the morning, turnout in Glasgow was 75% with "Yes" winning by 194,779 to the "No" campaign's 169,347.
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Image caption There were a few familiar faces in the crowd, including a man dressed as Scottish cult TV character Rab C Nesbitt.
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Image caption As the ballots began to arrive at the counting stations, early indications were that the "No" campaign was going to win, perhaps by a slightly larger majority than the polls suggested.
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Image caption With 26 out of the country's 32 council areas having declared, the BBC predicted that Scotland would vote to stay in the United Kingdom.
Image copyright Andy Buchanan/AFP
Image caption Pro-union supporters celebrated in Glasgow as the result became clearer.
Image copyright Lynne Cameron/PA
Image caption Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon told the BBC the projected result was "a deep personal and political disappointment" but argued that "the country has been changed forever".
Image copyright Russell Cheyne/reuters
Image caption For some of those who dreamed of an independent Scotland it was time for tears.
Image copyright Andy Buchanan/AFP
Image caption But there was no hiding the joy of those who wanted the UK to remain intact.
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Image caption Nationally, the margin of victory was 55% "No" to 45% "Yes".
Image copyright Russell Cheyne/reuters
Image caption Alex Salmond has said he accepts his defeat. The leader of the pro-independence campaign said the 1.6m votes cast for the "Yes" campaign represented a substantial vote for Scottish independence at some time in the future.
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Image caption Alistair Darling, leader of the Better Together campaign, said Scotland had chosen ''unity over division'' in rejecting independence from the United Kingdom.
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Image caption Back in London, Prime Minister David Cameron said he was delighted by the "No" result, which he says settles the issue for at least a generation.